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Kitchen of the Week: A Maine Farmhouse Kitchen That Doesn’t Play by the Rules

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Kitchen of the Week: A Maine Farmhouse Kitchen That Doesn’t Play by the Rules

November 8, 2018

We couldn’t go Up North this week without a stop by our favorite family compound on Spruce Head in Maine, where sculptor-turned-builder Anthony Esteves and his family live frozen in time. We’ve returned to this site again and again for inspiration from the young family’s handbuilt home, a look at their delightfully primitive kitchen, and a tour of the circa-1754 Cape that Esteves renovated for his mother. Today we’re revisiting the Cape’s farmhouse-inflected kitchen, where, Esteves says, “the goal was not to restore the Cape to its exact historic standard. Rather, the aesthetics are informed by the range of styles within early American homes.” The result: a rustic yet decidedly luxe kitchen with a pitch-perfect blend of historic charm and modern amenities.

Photography by Greta Rybus.

 The hand-hewn beams, wide-plank floors, and show-stopping run of paned windows over the sink are original to the circa-00s home. A modern luxury for an avid cook: the double-wide gas range.
Above: The hand-hewn beams, wide-plank floors, and show-stopping run of paned windows over the sink are original to the circa-1700s home. A modern luxury for an avid cook: the double-wide gas range.
Esteves chose a mix of Carrara marble and butcher block for the countertops and sourced an apron-front sink from Kohler Dickinson. The antique glass cloche is French—Esteves picked it up at Marston House on the island of Vinalhaven, Maine. (See our recent post, Marston House in Vinalhaven: French Vintage Style in Maine, for a full look.)
Above: Esteves chose a mix of Carrara marble and butcher block for the countertops and sourced an apron-front sink from Kohler Dickinson. The antique glass cloche is French—Esteves picked it up at Marston House on the island of Vinalhaven, Maine. (See our recent post, Marston House in Vinalhaven: French Vintage Style in Maine, for a full look.)
A closeup on the Carrara marble countertop. Thinking of using Carrara in your own kitchen? Read Remodeling data-src=
Above: A closeup on the Carrara marble countertop. Thinking of using Carrara in your own kitchen? Read Remodeling 101: Marble Countertops for everything you need to know.
Esteves lined a wall of the kitchen with a Shaker peg rail. Clean towels are stored in the round baskets under the island. The wire cages were sourced from Trillium Soaps and the wooden stools were another Marston House find.
Above: Esteves lined a wall of the kitchen with a Shaker peg rail. Clean towels are stored in the round baskets under the island. The wire cages were sourced from Trillium Soaps and the wooden stools were another Marston House find.
Additional hanging storage, courtesy of iron wall hooks affixed to the rafters. Esteves&#8
Above: Additional hanging storage, courtesy of iron wall hooks affixed to the rafters. Esteves’ mother uses them to display copper pots and pans.
The adjacent dining room, with a farm table and black spindle-backed chairs. The centerpiece is made of foraged blooms arranged by Esteves&#8
Above: The adjacent dining room, with a farm table and black spindle-backed chairs. The centerpiece is made of foraged blooms arranged by Esteves’ sister-in-law, who owns event design company One & Supp.
The Cape exterior.
Above: The Cape exterior.

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