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Trend Alert: Stitched Patchwork Cloths as Window Coverings

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Trend Alert: Stitched Patchwork Cloths as Window Coverings

October 1, 2021

Noticed recently: tone-on-tone cloths patched together in subtle, often perfectly imperfect windowpane patterns. We’ve spotted them in projects from the likes of Mjölk, Tamar Barnoon, and Serena Mitnik Miller and by designers from LA to Copenhagen, though credit for their provenance lies in the Korean tradition of pojagi (or bojagi).

According to Cooper Hewitt: “Bojagi cloths were essential elements of Korean households since the very beginning of the Joseon Dynasty in the late fourteenth century up until the 1950s”; artfully stitched together from scraps of cloth and used to wrap gifts, carry objects, or cover food, “these multipurpose textiles combined functionality, aesthetic, and craftsmanship.”

Similarly stitched cloths are making appearances lately as window coverings, where light coming through illuminates their handmade quality. Take a look.

niki tsukamoto of la based lookout & wonderland created a long swath of pat 9
Above: Niki Tsukamoto of LA-based Lookout & Wonderland created a long swath of patchwork panels for the California bedroom of Serena Mitnik-Miller (of General Store). Photograph courtesy of Serena Mitnik-Miller.
a closeup; the landscape is visible through lighter, thinner pieces of cloth. & 10
Above: A closeup; the landscape is visible through lighter, thinner pieces of cloth. “We worked together to create this color palette, which is all derived from sawdust of redwood,” says Serena. Photograph courtesy of Serena Mitnik-Miller.
stitched together window coverings can also be found on etsy, like this ramie k 11
Above: Stitched-together window coverings can also be found on Etsy, like this Ramie Korean Patchwork Curtain by South Korea-based maker LunarJogak ($134).
a white on white pojagi scarf from dosa, made from recycled khadi silk and cott 12
Above: A white-on-white Pojagi Scarf from Dosa, made from recycled khadi silk and cotton.
we&#8\2\17;ve posted before on lucy bathurst, &#8\2\20;custom curtain m 13
Above: We’ve posted before on Lucy Bathurst, “custom curtain maker to the stars.” Here are the simple cafe curtains she created of stitched-together linen voile at Spring restaurant in London.
&#8\2\20;i bought this fabric a few years back and kept some in my kit beca 14
Above: “I bought this fabric a few years back and kept some in my kit because it was just so, so lovely,” says designer Tamar Barnoon of this tacked-up cloth-as-curtain in a Topanga Canyon project. “This curtain was made from one of these pieces I saved.” We particularly like that this cloth leaves small square apertures between scraps for the sun to come through. Photograph by Laure Joliet.
long ago—in \20\15—we featured danish fashion and textile designer line san 15
Above: Long ago—in 2015—we featured Danish fashion and textile designer Line Sander Johansen (see Scrap Art: Patchwork Linens from Copenhagen), and she’s since become something of a superstar for her quilted designs. We particularly like the minimal cloths and curtains from her “scrapwork series,” like this abstract, tone-on-tone patchwork design. See more via #lsjscrapworkseries on Instagram. Photograph via Line Sander Johansen.
another curtain by lookout & wonderland, this one in shades of blue. photog 16
Above: Another curtain by Lookout & Wonderland, this one in shades of blue. Photograph courtesy of Lookout & Wonderland.
the home of fog linen founder yumiko sekine features a diy patchwork curtain ma 17
Above: The home of Fog Linen founder Yumiko Sekine features a DIY patchwork curtain made from sewn-together linen kitchen cloths. Photograph by Nao Shimizu.
and spotted on the instagram of john baker of toronto design shop mjölk: an et 18
Above: And spotted on the Instagram of John Baker of Toronto design shop Mjölk: an ethereal antique Korean cloth purchased from a market in Japan, used as simple window covering. Photograph via Mjölk.

For more design details we’re noting recently, see:

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