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Kitchen of the Week: A Plain English Interpretation in the East Village

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Kitchen of the Week: A Plain English Interpretation in the East Village

February 27, 2020

The kitchen in the Manhattan townhouse was brand new, complete with sleek white cabinets and stainless steel appliances. But it just didn’t feel quite like home, which, for the owners, is mainly in London. Their solution: Commission Plain English, the bespoke “cupboardmakers” from the UK, to design a cozy kitchen that reflects their British roots.

“The clients were looking for a feeling of their London home when away from home. They wanted to create warmth in a white box, while also ensuring the kitchen didn’t feel like fitted cabinets but rather pieces of furniture,” says Plain English’s design director, Merlin Wright. “They wanted a space for family breakfasts at the weekend and also a functional space for having a coffee or a piece of toast before running out of the door on weekdays.”

Let’s take a tour of the haute-humble space.

Photography courtesy of Plain English.

The kitchen is compact and anchors one end of a spacious open living area. Oversized windows welcome in an abundance of natural light.
Above: The kitchen is compact and anchors one end of a spacious open living area. Oversized windows welcome in an abundance of natural light.
Scandi leather and canvas chairs surround the dining table. For a similar look, try Kaare Klinte&#8
Above: Scandi leather and canvas chairs surround the dining table. For a similar look, try Kaare Klinte’s Safari Chair or Carl Hansen’s Huntsman Chair; for a similar industrial pendant light, try the Titan 3 Pendant from British lighting company Original BTC. (See 5 Favorites: Scandinavian Canvas and Wood Chairs.)
Raw oak open shelving in the peninsula adds a warm counterpoint to the cool palette.
Above: Raw oak open shelving in the peninsula adds a warm counterpoint to the cool palette.
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Above: “Having loved and lived with an Aga for so long, it was impossible for them to be able to cook on any other range cooker,” says Wright. “We used the Aga City here to combine the look of the traditional Aga in a more contemporary, up-to-date appliance.”
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Above: “The hardware is by Plain English, and it is our polished nickel finish. It adds a light, slightly industrial feel to the kitchen,” says Wright. “The twist catches also give it a nautical feel.” A cararra marble backsplash and counter coordinates with the gray cabinets, from the company’s Spitalfields line.
A warm gray from Little Greene Paint & Paper was selected for the cabinets. The peninsula is painted &#8
Above: A warm gray from Little Greene Paint & Paper was selected for the cabinets. The peninsula is painted “Draughty Passage” from Plain English’s own color collection.
The faucet is by Perrin & Rowe. (See details in  Easy Pieces: Traditional Bridge Faucets.) The countertop here is Pippy Oak, a young oak tree with lots of knots.
Above: The faucet is by Perrin & Rowe. (See details in 10 Easy Pieces: Traditional Bridge Faucets.) The countertop here is Pippy Oak, a young oak tree with lots of knots.

For more Plain English kitchens, see:

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