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A Modular Danish Summer House—with a Six-Month Lead Time

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A Modular Danish Summer House—with a Six-Month Lead Time

August 28, 2014

Danish architecture firm Lykke + Nielsen launched a side business designing modular cottages for summer living. Created from a simple modular template, the houses can be ready within six months of ordering and can be configured to fit different needs: There’s a bedroom module, a kitchen/bath module, a living room module, and a connecting breezeway module. Here are two examples from Lykke + Nielsen’s portfolio that caught our eye. We just need an architect in the US to riff off this idea and we’ll be all set.

Photographs via Small House Bliss.

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Above: A breezeway connects two living areas in the Lí¦ngehus modular cottage in the countryside south of Copenhagen. We like the way the exterior door opens to create a windbreak.

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Above: The cottage with the door closed. The siding is tar-treated larch.

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Above: This version is larger than the one above it; it’s located in a forest an hour north of Copenhagen. The summer cabin is made of two modules that sit at right angles; a deck adjoins the space between and extends the length of the living area.

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Above: The black metal windows and iron wood-burning stove provide a visual contrast to the all-white interior.

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Above: Floor-to-ceiling windows run the length of the living room allowing for plenty of light.

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Above: A view from the loft bedroom.

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Above: The streamlined white kitchen with black accents.

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Above: The downstairs bedroom opens to the outdoors.

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Above: The wall-mounted sink vanity gives the small bathroom a more spacious feel.

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Above: The attic bedroom is accessed by a ladder with skylights.

To learn more about Lykke + Nielsen’s modular designs, go to Moen Huset.

Browse our archive of Scandinavian finds, such as a Bohemian Island Cabin in Sweden and Rhapsody in Blue: Stylist Tiina Laakonen’s Hamptons House and her Finnish Midsummer Table.

N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on August 29, 2013, as part of our Into the Wild issue.

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