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Design Sleuth: Faye Toogood’s Electric Tea Kettle of Choice

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Design Sleuth: Faye Toogood’s Electric Tea Kettle of Choice

June 27, 2018

“Oh, look there’s the Faye Toogood showroom.” On a recent London jaunt, my friend and I were heading from Labour & Wait to lunch at the Rochelle Canteen when we ducked in to the esteemed artist-designer’s Shoreditch workspace and shop. It was as expected: gallery-like, austere, and intriguing. We took in the outsized Japanese denim trousers, the stoneware server with the four-legged base, the aptly named Roly-Poly Chair, and barely there Spade Chair (surprisingly comfortable). But what we left coveting was probably not even meant for our eyes: the electric tea kettle with the bentwood handle in the staff kitchen.

I furtively snapped some photos, only to later discover that what looked like a label was a safety inspection sticker. Happily, the very next day at Scandinavian emporium Skandium in South Kensington, there it was again in multiples. Here are the details.

Photography courtesy of Stelton.

a white emma electric kettle, with a steel body and beech handle, just like the 9
Above: A white Emma Electric Kettle, with a steel body and beech handle, just like the one we spotted at Faye Toogood’s, is £139 from Skandium—but, unfortunately, is wired only for European use. Produced by Stelton of Denmark, it’s part of the company’s recent midcentury-inspired Emma kitchen and tableware collection designed by Sebastian Holmbäck and Ulrik Nordentof. “No more having to buy the least ugly kettle,” says Holmbäck.
initially offered in white, gray, pale blue, and black, the line recently intro 10
Above: Initially offered in white, gray, pale blue, and black, the line recently introduced terracotta and nude. And, in addition to an electric kettle, there’s an Emma Vacuum Jug for Tea and Emma Vacuum Jug for Coffee, both $98 from Finnish Design Shop. Emma Cups (shown) and Emma Mugs are both £31.95 for two, in two shades of gray, from Stelton.
there&#8\2\17;s also an emma pitcher, \$\134 cad in gray, pale blue, and te 11
Above: There’s also an Emma Pitcher, $134 CAD in gray, pale blue, and terracotta, from the Modern Shop of Canada, and a laquerered steel Emma Serving Tray with beech handles, £89.95 from Stelton (the Emma Serving Tray is $121 at Royal Design).
a number of pieces from the emma collection are also available from amazon: the 12
Above: A number of pieces from the Emma collection are also available from Amazon: the Emma Vacuum Jug for Tea in black, for instance, is $135, and the Emma Porcelain Milk Pitcher is $33.06. The Emma Sugar Bowl is $29.95 from Y Living. Go to Stelton to see the whole ensemble and find the company’s around-the-world list of retailers.

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