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10 Easy Pieces: German-Designed Flatware

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10 Easy Pieces: German-Designed Flatware

February 28, 2018

The first German-designed flatware we fell for was from Carl Pott, the famed midcentury designer, but after some digging, we discovered a range of equally compelling German-designed flatware. Solingen in North Rhine-Westphalia, we discovered, is known for its cutlery manufacturing—pair that with a penchant for precision and you’ve got a winning formula. Here are our favorites.

The Thomas Feichtner Studio No.
Above: The Thomas Feichtner Studio No. 192 Flatware is made of solid silver for Jarosinski & Vaugoin of Austria and is available to order directly through the company.
Eichenlaub Flatware, forged in Solingen, Germany, are each made from a single piece of stainless steel and finished with wood, horn, or acrylic handles. The set shown here, in light oak, is available in Japan at Arts & Science and online at Scharfer Laden in Germany; €53. per piece.
Above: Eichenlaub Flatware, forged in Solingen, Germany, are each made from a single piece of stainless steel and finished with wood, horn, or acrylic handles. The set shown here, in light oak, is available in Japan at Arts & Science and online at Scharfer Laden in Germany; €53.10 per piece.

The Pott no. 35 Five-Piece Place Setting was designed by Carl Pott in 79 with a geometric shape and matte finish stainless steel; $4 for the set at Kneen & Co.
Above: The Pott no. 35 Five-Piece Place Setting was designed by Carl Pott in 1979 with a geometric shape and matte finish stainless steel; $410 for the set at Kneen & Co.
From Geweso in Solingen, Germany, the Spatan Flatware is made of / chrome-nickel-steel and has a stainless satin finish; €3.95 for a set of  pieces from Geweso. The Spaten style dates back to the 50s.
Above: From Geweso in Solingen, Germany, the Spatan Flatware is made of 18/10 chrome-nickel-steel and has a stainless satin finish; €183.95 for a set of 24 pieces from Geweso. The Spaten style dates back to the 1950s.
The Carl Mertens Senso Sky Flatware is sold as a 30-piece set for €3.
Above: The Carl Mertens Senso Sky Flatware is sold as a 30-piece set for €320.
The Picard & Wielpütz Ticino Cutlery Set was once used on Deutsche Lufthansa before plastic utensils replaced cutlery on airplanes. The four-piece set is €
Above: The Picard & Wielpütz Ticino Cutlery Set was once used on Deutsche Lufthansa before plastic utensils replaced cutlery on airplanes. The four-piece set is €217 at Manufactum.
The most-sold flatware in Germany, Peter Raacke&#8
Above: The most-sold flatware in Germany, Peter Raacke’s Mono-a Flatware (shown in the version with a long knife) is €120 per set from Mono. For a look at the same style with an ebony handle, see our post 10 Easy Pieces: Bistro-Style Stainless Flatware.
The Carl Pott Pott 33 Flatware from 75 is weighty, has a horizontal etch at the base, and a five-tined fork. Made in Mettmann, Germany, the five-piece set is $380 at Horne. Photograph by Heidi Swanson, who formerly carried the set at her shop Quitokeeto.
Above: The Carl Pott Pott 33 Flatware from 1975 is weighty, has a horizontal etch at the base, and a five-tined fork. Made in Mettmann, Germany, the five-piece set is $380 at Horne. Photograph by Heidi Swanson, who formerly carried the set at her shop Quitokeeto.
The Thomas Feichtner–designed Fina Flatware in stainless steel was made for German shop Carl Mertens and is available through a seller on Amazon; $data-src=
Above: The Thomas Feichtner–designed Fina Flatware in stainless steel was made for German shop Carl Mertens and is available through a seller on Amazon; $124 for the four-piece set.
The Herder Breakfast Cutlery is made by Robert Herder in Solingen, Germany with a knife that has a &#8
Above: The Herder Breakfast Cutlery is made by Robert Herder in Solingen, Germany with a knife that has a “buckelsklinge” (blunt-rounded blade); €56 for the fork-and-knife set at Manufactum.
The Worpswede 4-Piece Flatware Set from Carl Mertens has a hollow handle and has been produced since 3
Above: The Worpswede 4-Piece Flatware Set from Carl Mertens has a hollow handle and has been produced since 1932; €89 at Carl Mertens.
The Gehring Spaten Table Cutlery from Gehring in Solingen is another Spaten style set of flatware; €39 at Manufactum.
Above: The Gehring Spaten Table Cutlery from Gehring in Solingen is another Spaten style set of flatware; €39 at Manufactum.
For more flatware, see our posts:

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