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Trend Alert: The Cult of the Blue Kitchen, 10 Favorites

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Trend Alert: The Cult of the Blue Kitchen, 10 Favorites

August 6, 2017

This past year, it seems that every kitchen that’s crossed our desktops has one thing in common: cabinets painted a deep petrol blue. As well as a few other features: a single long kitchen counter with a subway tile backsplash, open shelving, and a kitchen island painted a corresponding blue. Is the cult of the blue kitchen upon us?

We first started noticing the trend when we featured the West London kitchen of chef Skye Gyngell. Designed by British Standard, the two-tone kitchen has cabinets painted in Farrow & Ball’s deep Hague Blue, a cult color in its own right, and upper walls painted white. (When we first saw the kitchen, we found ourselves thinking, If I had this kitchen I’d be just like Skye Gyngell, with an arsenal of fresh herbs and root vegetables stored in vintage jars.)

But why blue? Essayist Maggie Nelson notes in Bluets, her ode to the color blue, “culinary advisors generally recommend against blue light, blue paint, and blue plates when and where serving food.” Why then, is everyone painting their kitchen blue?

“Ask people their favorite color, and in most parts of the world roughly half will say blue,” Natalie Angier writes in the New York Times. More supporting evidence: Painting an interior in shades of blue can translate to an increase in home value, and, according to studies, it’s associated with decreased heart rates, improved concentration, enhanced creativity, and a sense of calm. Which all comes in useful in a room where you might find yourself wielding a saucepan, reading a recipe, tending a boiling-over pot, all at the same time.

Here are 10 kitchens that illustrate the new époque bleue era.

Gyngell&#8
Above: Gyngell’s kitchen by British Standard, Plain English’s more affordable offshoot, with cabinets painted in Farrow & Ball’s Hague Blue.
A kitchen in Sweden with dark blue painted cabinets and leather cabinet pulls featured on Swedish real estate site Entrance.
Above: A kitchen in Sweden with dark blue painted cabinets and leather cabinet pulls featured on Swedish real estate site Entrance.
A kitchen in Philadelphia hotel Lokal designed by Jersey Ice Cream Co., who used Sherwin Williams&#8
Above: A kitchen in Philadelphia hotel Lokal designed by Jersey Ice Cream Co., who used Sherwin Williams’s Seaworthy on the cabinetry.
The kitchen at Château de La Resle, a hotel in Burgundy, France, is designed in oak with a blue powder-coated steel work table.
Above: The kitchen at Château de La Resle, a hotel in Burgundy, France, is designed in oak with a blue powder-coated steel work table.
Editor Peggy Wang opted for Gyngell&#8
Above: Editor Peggy Wang opted for Gyngell’s pick, Hague Blue by Farrow & Ball, in her Ridgewood, Queens, remodel.
Another kitchen by British Standard with a colorblock effect, painted in Deep Space Blue from Little Greene.
Above: Another kitchen by British Standard with a colorblock effect, painted in Deep Space Blue from Little Greene.
A finalist in our Considered Design Awards, Heidi Lachapelle&#8
Above: A finalist in our Considered Design Awards, Heidi Lachapelle’s kitchen in Portland, Maine, features cabinets painted in Naval from Sherwin Williams.

 Custom cabinets are painted in Benjamin Moore&#8
Above: Custom cabinets are painted in Benjamin Moore’s Blue Danube in the Sonoma, California kitchen of Gail Deffarari.
Designer Laura Medicus painted the cabinets in a renovated Denver ranch house with Noir by Pratt & Lambert. Photograph courtesy of Laura Medicus Interiors.
Above: Designer Laura Medicus painted the cabinets in a renovated Denver ranch house with Noir by Pratt & Lambert. Photograph courtesy of Laura Medicus Interiors.
A kitchen in Fort Greene, Brooklyn by Elizabeth Roberts with cabinets painted in Benjamin Moore&#8
Above: A kitchen in Fort Greene, Brooklyn by Elizabeth Roberts with cabinets painted in Benjamin Moore’s Newport Green.
A kitchen in Mill Valley by architect Ken Linsteadt with lower cabinets painted in Farrow & Ball&#8
Above: A kitchen in Mill Valley by architect Ken Linsteadt with lower cabinets painted in Farrow & Ball’s Oval Room Blue.
More on cult design:

Product summary  

Maggie Nelson

Bluets

$13.48 USD from Amazon

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