Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

Wild at Heart: Ceramicist Tracy Wilkinson’s Off-the-Beaten-Path Sanctuary

Search

Wild at Heart: Ceramicist Tracy Wilkinson’s Off-the-Beaten-Path Sanctuary

September 9, 2019

Last week, we spotlighted Takashi Yanai‘s inventive home, featured in the wonderful new book, Creative Spaces, by the founders of Poketo. Today, we’re happy to share another home tour from the book, that of designer and ceramicist Tracy Wilkinson.

Wilkinson has been on our radar for a while; she participated in our LA Remodelista Market some years ago (see our stories on her handwoven raffia lamps here and on her ceramic planters here), and we aren’t surprised in the least that her home would buzz with the same creative energy and rustic beauty as her works. Built in 1946, the house rests in the hillside community of Mt. Washington. It’s minutes from downtown LA yet feels on the wild side—a perfect environment for the creative life.

“I’ve always wanted a life where I can do anything, design anything, make anything that I feel like making. Opportunities and challenges make me happy and allow me to keep growing,” she says in the book.

Join us for a tour of her effortlessly cool and free-spirited home and studio.

Photography by Ye Rin Mok, from Creative Spaces.

Wilkinson, a British transplant, with her loyal sidekick, Brownie. Displayed on her coffee table are some of her ceramic works. Her home is situated high up in the hills and rests under the glare of direct sunlight; dark interiors offer a cool respite.
Above: Wilkinson, a British transplant, with her loyal sidekick, Brownie. Displayed on her coffee table are some of her ceramic works. Her home is situated high up in the hills and rests under the glare of direct sunlight; dark interiors offer a cool respite.
Cowhide rugs add to the “frontier” vibe of the home.
Above: Cowhide rugs add to the “frontier” vibe of the home.
Wood-paneled ceilings and brick walls keep the house cool on hot days. Hanging in the corner is one of her woven raffia creations.
Above: Wood-paneled ceilings and brick walls keep the house cool on hot days. Hanging in the corner is one of her woven raffia creations.
Brownie and Wilkinson in front of the fireplace, integrated into a stunning stone wall.
Above: Brownie and Wilkinson in front of the fireplace, integrated into a stunning stone wall.
The lamp and wall hangings are all by Wilkinson. For similar foldable chairs, check out GloDea.
Above: The lamp and wall hangings are all by Wilkinson. For similar foldable chairs, check out GloDea.
A trio of woven works anchors a corner of her bedroom. The Pollock-esque wall behind her bed is an example of Wilkinson’s love for the imperfect and improvised. The black splatters are actually the remnants of glue that remained after she removed a grid of mirrors. Her plan was to create a white wall, but after she spied the unintentional art on the plywood, she decided to keep it.
Above: A trio of woven works anchors a corner of her bedroom. The Pollock-esque wall behind her bed is an example of Wilkinson’s love for the imperfect and improvised. The black splatters are actually the remnants of glue that remained after she removed a grid of mirrors. Her plan was to create a white wall, but after she spied the unintentional art on the plywood, she decided to keep it.
A row of work overalls and jumpsuits create a beautiful vignette.
Above: A row of work overalls and jumpsuits create a beautiful vignette.
Wilkinson turned the garage into her studio.
Above: Wilkinson turned the garage into her studio.
Wilkinson’s pieces are available for purchase on her TWWorkshop website.
Above: Wilkinson’s pieces are available for purchase on her TWWorkshop website.
A cinder-block-formed firepit is surrounded by stumps-turned-stools.
Above: A cinder-block-formed firepit is surrounded by stumps-turned-stools.

For more peeks into the homes of ceramicists, see:

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

From our network