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Kitchen of the Week: Maximum Storage in a Streamlined Galley By Jack Trench

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Kitchen of the Week: Maximum Storage in a Streamlined Galley By Jack Trench

August 13, 2020

The galley kitchen with its straight-shot layout is derived from nautical design and celebrated for its space efficiencies. Restaurants favor galley setups and so do plenty of serious cooks, especially in urban settings (see our own Julie Carlson’s Brooklyn galley here).

The artist owner of this ground-floor flat in a Georgian townhouse in London’s Islington recruited Jack Trench, who runs an eponymous kitchen and furniture design firm, to come up with a clean-lined galley that looks at home in its historic setting. Maximum storage was also requested, along with plenty of elbow room. Join us for a look at the shipshape results.

Photography courtesy of Jack Trench.

composed of streamlined cabinets of laminate clad mdf with oak edging, the kitc 9
Above: Composed of streamlined cabinets of laminate-clad MDF with oak edging, the kitchen has windows at either end: the French doors overlook an eating area and garden. The design is known as the JT Original.

“To respect the building’s original cornicing, we decided to not the run the cabinets right up to the ceiling, so as to give breathing space to the architectural detailing.” Jack tells us. He also notes that the counter on the left is a bit shallower than the one on the right to work around an original chimney breast that had to stay in place. “For a bit of extra space, we inserted a full-length open shelf for keeping everyday worktop essentials.”

the counters are silestone in gris expo, as are the backsplashes (with a suede  10
Above: The counters are Silestone in Gris Expo, as are the backsplashes (with a suede finish). The five-burner cooktop is by Siemens and the under-cabinet extractor is the Weston Cache 700. Note the integrated under-shelf lighting: for tips on recessed lighting, read our Expert Advice from Architect Oliver Freundlich.
while the kitchen was being planned, things like juicers and ice cream machines 11
Above: While the kitchen was being planned, things like juicers and ice cream machines were discussed. “Our client wanted lots of cupboard space for both everyday crockery and glassware as well as less frequently used kitchen equipment,” says Jack. “We decided that the upper cabinets on the left-hand galley would be higher up for longer-term storage and also to give enough height from the cooktop to accommodate the built-in extractor.”
the drawers have finger scoops in lieu of hardware, and custom fittings, such a 12
Above: The drawers have finger scoops in lieu of hardware, and custom fittings, such as this cutlery drawer of birch plywood.

&#8\2\20;there are two sinks here—it’s always useful to have more than  13
Above: “There are two sinks here—it’s always useful to have more than one sink unit, and for this design since there was a Quooker Fushion tap [a combination hot, cold, and boiling water faucet], it was essential for practical reasons,” says Jack.
Note the two wall ovens—one is a combination oven and microwave.

the cabinets are detailed with birch plywood pulls and interiors. jack notes th 14
Above: The cabinets are detailed with birch plywood pulls and interiors. Jack notes that the cabinets on this side were designed “for easy access when emptying the dishwasher.”
the room opens to the dining area painted farrow & ball&#8\2\17;s all w 15
Above: The room opens to the dining area painted Farrow & Ball’s All White. That’s the fridge and freezer in the cabinets next to the sink. The kitchen and dining room together are 25 square meters (approximately 269 square feet).

Jack Trench and his small team work with designers and directly with clients on custom kitchens that are fabricated in his workshop in Tottenham Hale in north London. The company showroom is in Clerkenwell.
To see another of his minimalist galleys, go to Kitchen of the Week: A Modern Hardworking Kitchen in a Georgian Townhouse.

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