Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

A Rescued Georgian in a ‘Time-Capsule Enclave’ in the Center of London

Search

A Rescued Georgian in a ‘Time-Capsule Enclave’ in the Center of London

October 15, 2018

UK-based real estate site The Modern House is at the top of our browsing list. We’re not fantasy house-hunting—well, Julie might be—we’re looking for is visual inspiration. Our latest favorite listing: a Georgian terrace house in the center of London on Roupell Street, a “time-capsule enclave” where historic dramas are regularly filmed.

Homeowner James Findlay Robertson shares our passion. A partner in a London law firm, he’s also a committed remodeler. Overhauling houses is such an interest, in fact, that a few years ago while working with London firm Fraher Architects, he proposed expanding the scope of the firm’s work to include design-build and project management.

“I had done a number of refurbishments and after working with architects, I used to get so frustrated having to handle all of the planning issues, dealing with contractors, and project management, and, most importantly, as a client, getting transparency on cost and time, Robertson tells us. “It is often said that whatever you think it will cost, double that and double the time you think it will take. But that is just unacceptable.” Known as Findlay Fraher, the offshoot company offers start-to-finish service: Liz Fraher oversees the architectural design; Joe Fraher, who is also an architect, takes care of the contracting, engineering, and carpentry, and Robertson does the interior sourcing.

Robertson himself was the client on the Roupell Street project, which hadn’t been lived in for more than a decade: “We wanted to show what could be done starting with a small, derelict, dark house in a complex site that had complicated planning and listing issues but a brilliant and iconic location,” he explains. Robertson has since begun work on his next rescues: “I’m afraid I love doing projects, and Liz, Joe, and I love working together.” Join us for a look at what they do.

Photography courtesy of The Modern House, except where noted.

the house is the one with the blue door and window frames. much of it, from bas 9
Above: The house is the one with the blue door and window frames. Much of it, from basement to roof, required rebuilding, and an extension was added in the back, expanding the interior from 828 to 1,345 square feet. Photograph via Fraher Architects.

“When I bought the property, it had no services and had to bought as-seen with no survey and had been empty so long that it had no water and had not been connected to the mains drains,” says Robertson. “We literally had to bring it back to life.”

the architects set out to re introduce period style features while also creatin 10
Above: The architects set out to re-introduce period-style features while also creating an interior that feels bright and modern. And cohesive: the repeat use of details, such as paneled walls (often incorporating doors) and herringbone floors, creates a very pulled-together look. The entry stair is entirely new.
built in shelving and a work space with coffered paneling in the living room. t 11
Above: Built-in shelving and a work space with coffered paneling in the living room. The paneling throughout is painted a lightened version of Farrow & Ball’s Elephant’s Breath.
the millwork was designed and fabricated by shape london, a partner business of 12
Above: The millwork was designed and fabricated by Shape London, a partner business of Findlay Fraher’s.
a glazed infill extension allowed for a bright, eat in kitchen overlooking a co 13
Above: A glazed infill extension allowed for a bright, eat-in kitchen overlooking a courtyard garden. Photograph via Fraher Architects.

The table was built by Shape and the chairs are 1956 Danish originals with seating fabric selected to echo the exterior brick. The framed map folios show central London in the 1780s, when the area the house occupies was marshland. Though the house feels removed from the hubbub of the city, it’s actually in the thick of things: the building towering over the courtyard is part of Waterloo Station.

the oak kitchen cabinets have spray painted mdf fronts with oak finger pulls. 14
Above: The oak kitchen cabinets have spray-painted MDF fronts with oak finger pulls.

As in the entry, the floor is oiled engineered oak sourced from Havwoods. The herringbone pattern continues in the terrace granite floor: its gray-blue stone works well with the sash windows, which are all new and painted Farrow & Ball’s Hague Blue, a “heritage color.” Colored window frames, the architects point out, are “much more historically accurate than white.”

marble counters are surrounded by a backsplash of marble mosaic tiles sourced f 15
Above: Marble counters are surrounded by a backsplash of marble mosaic tiles sourced from Fired Earth.
upper cabinets of white oiled douglas fir conceal the range hood and provide ex 16
Above: Upper cabinets of white-oiled Douglas fir conceal the range hood and provide extra storage. Go to Hoods and Vents to read up on the options.
the two bedrooms on the second floor have interior venetian shutters. 17
Above: The two bedrooms on the second floor have interior Venetian shutters.
a whimsical floral art piece is mounted to the wall in the master bedroom. 18
Above: A whimsical floral art piece is mounted to the wall in the master bedroom.
the bedroom&#8\2\17;s closets are incorporated into paneling that surrounds 19
Above: The bedroom’s closets are incorporated into paneling that surrounds a new working fireplace of black slate. Photograph via Fraher Architects.
the kitchen&#8\2\17;s marble mosaic tiles reappear in the master bath, wher 20
Above: The kitchen’s marble mosaic tiles reappear in the master bath, where they extend across the bathtub. The black countertop washbasins are Studio Arius’s Circus design from Original Bathrooms and the hanging mirrors were made for the project by Shape. The wall-mounted toilet is by Flaminia.
a paneled alcove bed and framed vintage poster in the guest room. the bestlite  21
Above: A paneled alcove bed and framed vintage poster in the guest room. The Bestlite Sconces are a longstanding Remodelista favorite.
the courtyard is designed as a fuss free urban garden with diy planters of pain 22
Above: The courtyard is designed as a fuss-free urban garden with DIY planters of painted concrete blocks and wooden planters on wheels. The double-doored back entrance is big enough for a car and the Findlay Fraher team even added an electric-car charging point. The Modern House reports the property is currently under offer.

Tour three more standout London remodels with us:

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0