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9 New Paint Colors from Farrow & Ball: A Color Field Trip with Zio and Sons

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9 New Paint Colors from Farrow & Ball: A Color Field Trip with Zio and Sons

October 15, 2018

Dorset-based Farrow & Ball recently released nine new colors, ranging from an exotic pink and a deep red, to a soft off white and down-to-earth blue—the company’s first release since 2016. Chosen to rebalance the Farrow & Ball color card, the new additions will replace nine existing shades to preserve the curated palette of 132 paint colors.

To showcase the new range, Farrow & Ball enlisted Hudson, NY-based designer Anthony D’Argenzio of Zio and Sons to create what he calls a “color field trip” at the historic National Historic Landmark Oliver Bronson house (read more about the house’s history at Historic Hudson). Working with Charlotte Cosby, Farrow & Ball’s creative director, Anthony created nine vignettes in the Oliver Bronson’s characterful spaces, sourcing props from around Hudson and working with local design outfits such as Hawkins NY and Source Adage, with florals from Flower Kraut. “We were trying to hit all the visual, scent, and taste notes for this project,” Anthony says.

Here’s a look:.

Creative set design & photography by Zio & Sons.

“”Named after Japanese tea leaves, Bancha, like a cup of green tea, provides a feeling of security. We used  dried greens and Japanese accents like a cast iron Japanese teapot,” Anthony says. According to Farrow & Ball, “Bancha, a mid-century modern green, is a darker version of the much loved archive color, Olive. Perfect for those who want to embrace stronger color in the home, its sober tone creates rooms that feel calm and serene.”
Above: “”Named after Japanese tea leaves, Bancha, like a cup of green tea, provides a feeling of security. We used  dried greens and Japanese accents like a cast iron Japanese teapot,” Anthony says. According to Farrow & Ball, “Bancha, a mid-century modern green, is a darker version of the much loved archive color, Olive. Perfect for those who want to embrace stronger color in the home, its sober tone creates rooms that feel calm and serene.”
“School House White is a vintage, taupey white with cool undertones inspired by the colors used in old school houses,” Anthony says. (To execute the project, Anthony worked with the team at Hudson Valley-based Rider Painting.)
Above: “School House White is a vintage, taupey white with cool undertones inspired by the colors used in old school houses,” Anthony says. (To execute the project, Anthony worked with the team at Hudson Valley-based Rider Painting.)
According to Farrow & Ball, “Sulking Room Pink is a romantic and muted rose with enormous warmth, its powdery feel makes it incredibly soft and easy to use with complementary tones. It’s evocative of the colors so often used in boudoirs, a room named after the French ‘bouder’—to sulk.”
Above: According to Farrow & Ball, “Sulking Room Pink is a romantic and muted rose with enormous warmth, its powdery feel makes it incredibly soft and easy to use with complementary tones. It’s evocative of the colors so often used in boudoirs, a room named after the French ‘bouder’—to sulk.”
A chic red-based black, “Paean Black conjures up the shade of old leather hymnals and is named after a song of praise,” according to Farrow & Ball. “For this vignette we painted old religious tomes in Paean Black to create a moody look,” Anthony says. Above: A chic red-based black, “Paean Black conjures up the shade of old leather hymnals and is named after a song of praise,” according to Farrow & Ball. “For this vignette we painted old religious tomes in Paean Black to create a moody look,” Anthony says.

“Preference Red is the deepest and richest of our reds and is named in honor of our original trade name, Preference Paints,” according to Farrow & Ball. “It’s the preferred red of modern homes.”
Above: “Preference Red is the deepest and richest of our reds and is named in honor of our original trade name, Preference Paints,” according to Farrow & Ball. “It’s the preferred red of modern homes.”
“Treron, inspired by the Treron pigeon, is a dark gray green; it’s a darker version of Farrow & Ball classic Pigeon, hence it’s named after the green variety of the same species,” according to Farrow & Ball.
Above: “Treron, inspired by the Treron pigeon, is a dark gray green; it’s a darker version of Farrow & Ball classic Pigeon, hence it’s named after the green variety of the same species,” according to Farrow & Ball.
“Jitney is named after the bus that whisks New Yorkers out of the hot city to the sandy beaches of the Hamptons,” according to Farrow & Ball. “It’s an earthy color that sits somewhere between the more traditional Oxford Stone and grayer Elephant’s Breath.” Anthony created a beach tableau using a length of weathered fence he found in Provincetown as well as pots of beach grass.
Above: “Jitney is named after the bus that whisks New Yorkers out of the hot city to the sandy beaches of the Hamptons,” according to Farrow & Ball. “It’s an earthy color that sits somewhere between the more traditional Oxford Stone and grayer Elephant’s Breath.” Anthony created a beach tableau using a length of weathered fence he found in Provincetown as well as pots of beach grass.
“Rangwali is an exotic, happy, and vital pink; it’s the most adventurous of our pinks,” according to Farrow & Ball. “It takes its name from the powder which is thrown so enthusiastically during the Holi festival of colors in India. Though bright, it has an absorbing depth of color which is achieved by adding a small dose of black pigment.”
Above: “Rangwali is an exotic, happy, and vital pink; it’s the most adventurous of our pinks,” according to Farrow & Ball. “It takes its name from the powder which is thrown so enthusiastically during the Holi festival of colors in India. Though bright, it has an absorbing depth of color which is achieved by adding a small dose of black pigment.”
“De Nimes is a quietly elegant blue that feels wonderfully down to earth; the exact shade is rooted in a regency palette but is inspired by the cloth of everyday workwear made in the French city Nîmes.”
Above: “De Nimes is a quietly elegant blue that feels wonderfully down to earth; the exact shade is rooted in a regency palette but is inspired by the cloth of everyday workwear made in the French city Nîmes.”

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