Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

Summer in the Chateau Garden: 11 Vintage Ideas to Steal from Cafe Ineko in Paris

Search

Summer in the Chateau Garden: 11 Vintage Ideas to Steal from Cafe Ineko in Paris

July 21, 2017

The cafe that has us wanting to book a ticket to Paris looks, surprisingly, very little like Paris: Café Ineko, a laid-back tea house with cane furniture, spigots set charmingly into the wall, and cool stonework, feels more South of France than where it is, on Rue des Gravilliers in the capital’s Third Arrondissement. Owner Ines de Villeneuve (the former merchandising director at Luis Vuitton) and her life partner, interior designer Francois Champsaur, wanted to design a place in the middle of the city that felt like Champsaur’s native Marseille and Provence: “a place with a Mediterranean touch, ‘cabanon’ spirit, full of light and authentic materials like plaster, wood, and furniture from the flea market,” de Villeneuve says. When they found an abandoned former bakery just north of the Marais, the couple undertook six months of renovations to transform the run-down “long dark corridor” into a bright cafe with three distinct spaces and styles. At the front, a terrasse of sorts, de Villeneuve says, “which invites people to enter.” Here are 11 ideas to steal.

Photography by Alison Engstrom for Remodelista.

1. Make a first impression.

Consider curb appeal: To invite passerby into Café Ineko, de Villeneuve and Champsaur transformed the facade with new wood trim. “The building is from the 17th century and protected,” de Villeneuve says, so after getting special authorization from the city, they tread carefully to upgrade the exterior (and the interiors) with respect to its history. Potted plants, custom steel-frame doors and windows, and trailing vines add to the charm.
Above: Consider curb appeal: To invite passerby into Café Ineko, de Villeneuve and Champsaur transformed the facade with new wood trim. “The building is from the 17th century and protected,” de Villeneuve says, so after getting special authorization from the city, they tread carefully to upgrade the exterior (and the interiors) with respect to its history. Potted plants, custom steel-frame doors and windows, and trailing vines add to the charm.

2. Mix and match garden furniture, indoors.

The front terrasse room has the feel of a laid-back garden in a generations-old family estate, thanks to mix-and-match vintage garden furniture that de Villeneuve sourced from flea markets and brocantes in the South of France. For easy charm, follow suit: Mix indoor with outdoor chairs, cane with metal, and a cushion or two. (The plaster lights were designed by Champsaur.)
Above: The front terrasse room has the feel of a laid-back garden in a generations-old family estate, thanks to mix-and-match vintage garden furniture that de Villeneuve sourced from flea markets and brocantes in the South of France. For easy charm, follow suit: Mix indoor with outdoor chairs, cane with metal, and a cushion or two. (The plaster lights were designed by Champsaur.)

3. Take cues from greenhouses.

For a respite from the heat, add elements from the garden. In a quirky vignette by the front window: A copper spigot in the wall is positioned above a stone basin, a flea market find which will soon house herbs.
Above: For a respite from the heat, add elements from the garden. In a quirky vignette by the front window: A copper spigot in the wall is positioned above a stone basin, a flea market find which will soon house herbs.
Ferns and air plants seem to grow from the stone walls in the front terrasse room.
Above: Ferns and air plants seem to grow from the stone walls in the front terrasse room.

4. Curate a high/low mix of tableware.

On a vintage cafe table, ceramics by an Italian artisan living in Belgium mix with Japanese wooden trays and “classical glassware for French bistros.” Simple shapes keep it cohesive.
Above: On a vintage cafe table, ceramics by an Italian artisan living in Belgium mix with Japanese wooden trays and “classical glassware for French bistros.” Simple shapes keep it cohesive.

5. Evoke vintage summer with caned furniture.

Vintage caned chairs, brought indoors, convey garden ease. Similar styles are available on Etsy.
Above: Vintage caned chairs, brought indoors, convey garden ease. Similar styles are available on Etsy.

6. Add a well-placed spout or two for intrigue.

Brass spouts set into the wall water plants, and, as shown here, also serve as impromptu holders for cutting boards.
Above: Brass spouts set into the wall water plants, and, as shown here, also serve as impromptu holders for cutting boards.

7. Nurture good bones.

De Villeneuve and Champsaur took cues from the feel of each section within the “atypical long space.” Here, a high-ceilinged area was left bright and open, beams and archways become niches for dining, and vintage cafe furniture in muted hues doesn’t compete with room’s light and simple lines.
Above: De Villeneuve and Champsaur took cues from the feel of each section within the “atypical long space.” Here, a high-ceilinged area was left bright and open, beams and archways become niches for dining, and vintage cafe furniture in muted hues doesn’t compete with room’s light and simple lines.
Renovate with respect to history. Beams are left to show through, and a bench, set under a sloped ceiling, makes a charming seating area.
Above: Renovate with respect to history. Beams are left to show through, and a bench, set under a sloped ceiling, makes a charming seating area.

8. Forget gallery walls: Make a statement with small details.

In a more polished, streamlined section of the cafe (with furniture by Champsaur), statements come from small details, like a bundle of greenery hung above a table. To get the look, consider hanging a single detail—a small painting, a bunch of greens—on an otherwise empty wall.
Above: In a more polished, streamlined section of the cafe (with furniture by Champsaur), statements come from small details, like a bundle of greenery hung above a table. To get the look, consider hanging a single detail—a small painting, a bunch of greens—on an otherwise empty wall.
Another small statement: A single brass ship’s light from Paris-based shop Inédit Lighting.
Above: Another small statement: A single brass ship’s light from Paris-based shop Inédit Lighting.

9. Stack, rather than lay out, tableware.

For an impromptu table setting, stack napkins, placemats, and glassware on the table and set out vintage baskets heaping with flatware. Here, woven placemats become a design object when set in a wooden bowl. (De Villeneuve sourced design elements that would feel “in line with the products that I was sourcing: grains, flour, olive oil, almonds, etc., coming from Sicilia, South of France, Mallorca”—the placemats are from Mauritius.)
Above: For an impromptu table setting, stack napkins, placemats, and glassware on the table and set out vintage baskets heaping with flatware. Here, woven placemats become a design object when set in a wooden bowl. (De Villeneuve sourced design elements that would feel “in line with the products that I was sourcing: grains, flour, olive oil, almonds, etc., coming from Sicilia, South of France, Mallorca”—the placemats are from Mauritius.)

10. Invest in artisan-made flatware.

Seek out beautiful flatware for daily use. Here, knives handmade by an artisan in Mallorca mingle with mix-and-match silver.
Above: Seek out beautiful flatware for daily use. Here, knives handmade by an artisan in Mallorca mingle with mix-and-match silver.

11. Embrace quirk.

Steel-frame windows double as handwritten signs—and a place for quirky, almost hidden doodles by Paris-based artist YAK.
Above: Steel-frame windows double as handwritten signs—and a place for quirky, almost hidden doodles by Paris-based artist YAK.
The entryway.
Above: The entryway.

More design ideas to steal from our favorite restaurants:

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

From our network