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GreenHouse: A Natural Wine Bar in Paris, Botanical Edition

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GreenHouse: A Natural Wine Bar in Paris, Botanical Edition

July 13, 2017

New in Paris, on a quiet street near the Ménilmontant metro: GreenHouse, a quiet green cafe serving garden-fresh dishes and natural wines. The tiny space is the newest venture of California-born chef/owner, Kristin Frederick, who opened Le Camion Qui Fume (known as the first food truck in France) a few years back. Now, she’s transformed a former “American-style sandwich shop” on Rue Crespin de Gast with vintage French school chairs, botanical prints, collected glassware, and brocante finds sourced by Vanessa Grall of Paris blog Messy Nessy. “We were working with a very small budget, but wanted to give it a bit of a quirky feel,” Frederick says. “Plants and garden-related elements were obligatory.” Outside, on the terrace, is a Paris rarity: a small kitchen garden that’s open the community. Join us for a look.

Photography by Alison Engstrom for Remodelista.

The front entry, looking out onto the potager. When Frederick found the space, it had &#8
Above: The front entry, looking out onto the potager. When Frederick found the space, it had “a fast food feel,” she says. “We had to warm it up to encourage our customers to get comfortable.” Frederick sourced houseplants and vintage furniture to save money and create a thoughtful, green space.
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Above: “Welcome to GreenHouse.”
To cut costs, the team preserved a few features from the sandwich shop, including the menu board and the tiled floor. (The floor &#8
Above: To cut costs, the team preserved a few features from the sandwich shop, including the menu board and the tiled floor. (The floor “is something we wouldn’t dare touch,” Frederick adds.)
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Above: “A small sink was left over from the previous concept but it’s so dang practical,” Frederick says. “It’s for customers, and us after gardening.” The metal shelving units are also remnants from the sandwich shop.
Clipped to one wall: a vignette of botanical prints, designed by Vanessa Grall of Messy Nessy.
Above: Clipped to one wall: a vignette of botanical prints, designed by Vanessa Grall of Messy Nessy.
On the repurposed metal shelves: mix-and-match glassware and a green pitcher from Merci. Grall &#8
Above: On the repurposed metal shelves: mix-and-match glassware and a green pitcher from Merci. Grall “scowered Paris” for vintage garden books, like Les Plantes du Monde.
A quartet of baskets from Maisons du Monde. &#8
Above: A quartet of baskets from Maisons du Monde. “They are waiting for me to put plants in them,” Frederick says.
Outside are vintage French school chairs and tables, sourced from a local brocante dealer. The team collected the glass water carafes (&#8
Above: Outside are vintage French school chairs and tables, sourced from a local brocante dealer. The team collected the glass water carafes (“old bottles of who knows what,” Frederick says).
Glimpsed behind the outdoor tables: the raised-bed potager. In order to start a working community kitchen garden on a Paris street, the team had to get authorization from the city; &#8
Above: Glimpsed behind the outdoor tables: the raised-bed potager. In order to start a working community kitchen garden on a Paris street, the team had to get authorization from the city; “then it was a matter of getting the community involved to help us plant and protect it,” Frederick says. Now, the garden produces fruit, vegetables, edible flowers, and herbs for use in the garden-fresh dishes. Visitors are welcome to help tend the garden—or to pick a few ingredients to take home.

Herbs and cuttings, ready for the kitchen.
Above: Herbs and cuttings, ready for the kitchen.

Reader tip: GreenHouse serves food mid-day, and turns into a natural wine bar in the evening. Consider stopping in for a glass near the garden.

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