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Domestic Science: A Magic Fly Repeller

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Domestic Science: A Magic Fly Repeller

August 25, 2015

An old-fashioned summer staple in the Napa Valley where I live is a plastic bag filled with water and hung from farmhouse back doors. It took me a while to realize that this not-so-glamorous device is an effective way to keep flies and other summer insects at bay (alas, mosquitoes are not deterred).

Leave it to the chaps at Kaufmann Mercantile to source a good-looking equivalent: the Anti-Fly Glass Sphere by Mexico City designer José de la O of Studio José de la O. No excuse now not to give it a go.   

Anti fly glass shere with leather rope remodelista

Above: The Anti-Fly Glass Sphere hangs from a leather rope and is $99. 

anti fly glass sphere made in mexico city remodelista

Above: It is the refraction of light against the water that confuses insects, especially flies, and keeps them away.

anti fly glass sphere kaufmann mercantile remodelista 0

Above: De la O worked with a family-run glass-blowing business in Mexico City to create these mouth-blown vessels. Just fill with water and suspend near food.

Looking to add to your insect arsenal? See Gardenista’s Five Favorite Fly Swatters and consider making a batch of Alexa’s DIY: Bug Repellent Balm. And if the bugs still bite, have a look at Erin’s Natural Mosquito Bite Remedies (used tea bags are one of the seven solutions).

N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on July 2, 2014, as part of our Block Party issue.

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