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RADD Roundup: Concrete

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RADD Roundup: Concrete

January 12, 2013

We're always surprised at the variety of settings in which concrete is the perfect fit. It's a clear choice with other neutrals and plays surprisingly well with warmer colors. It adds a casual note and utilitarian feel wherever it goes.

Here, five great uses of concrete (and concrete-like materials) from members of the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory.

Above: This home in Palo Alto, CA by BAR Architects apposes a solid surface–here, painted, sand-finish stucco–against ample glazing to create a quintessentially Californian indoor/outdoor style. Photo by Doug Dun.

Above: Interior designer Michelle Burgess worked with architects Being Indigo on this home on Orcas Island outside of Seattle. The concrete panels surrounding the fireplace are an uncommon 11 feet tall to match the height of custom oversized doors at the front and back of the house.

Above: A perfect juxtaposition of cool gray concrete against the warmer tones of wood, from Oakland designers Medium Plenty. For more on the firm and a recent kitchen remodel, see The Architect is In: Medium Plenty in San Francisco.

Above: When remodeling his own home in New Milford, Connecticut, architect Donald Billinkoff had to think creatively to hide the 1968 home's original fireplace–a multicolored terrazzo oddity that was "built to last." His budget-friendly solution was to hide the original fireplace facade behind stacked concrete block with steel shelving. See more work at Billinkoff Architecture.

Above: Oakland-based Envelope A+D seamlessly extended a prominent board-formed concrete wall from the outdoors in. For more of the firm's work, see Steal This Look: Delfina Pizzeria by Envelope A + D.

Just can't get enough concrete? See 638 uses of concrete in our gallery of rooms and spaces.

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