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10 Ideas to Steal from The Ozarker Lodge, a Redone Mid-Century Motel in Missouri

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10 Ideas to Steal from The Ozarker Lodge, a Redone Mid-Century Motel in Missouri

Diana Paulson November 1, 2023

Amy Pariser and Christine Babini always dreamed of transforming an old motor lodge into a boutique hotel—just one of the reasons they teamed up to launch Parini, their Detroit-based hospitality design studio. But when the duo received an offer to take on that exact project, it seemed too good to be true. “I thought it was definitely spam,” says Amy. “I thought someone overheard us talking on one of our phones or laptops and we were getting targeted.”

But the email was legitimate. Branding experts Jeremy Wells and Dustin Myers had purchased a 1950s roadside motel in Branson, Missouri, and they wanted Amy and Christine to reimagine it for the modern vacationer. Formerly known as Fall Creek Inn & Suites, the 102-guest room property would be renamed The Ozarker Lodge—and it was the opportunity the women had been waiting for.

Over the course of a year, Amy and Christine turned the porte-cochère into an inviting double-height lobby and completely rehabbed the guest rooms that had been rundown from decades of smokers and pets. Then they refreshed the motel with an earthy color palette and a nostalgic aesthetic—all with materials sourced as locally as possible, ensuring that The Ozarker Lodge is a true celebration of the Midwest.

Here are 10 ideas to steal from the new design.

Photography by Diana Paulson.

1. Keep what’s original.

the owners originally planned to replace the existing motel sign with a more co 17
Above: The owners originally planned to replace the existing motel sign with a more contemporary version, but Amy and Christine convinced them to restore the original instead. The new wood planks and sans serif neon logo bring modern flare to the retro silhouette.

2. Tile the bar.

the bar/check in desk is tiled in glossy rust toned tiles with dark gray granit 18
Above: The bar/check-in desk is tiled in glossy rust-toned tiles with dark gray granite countertops. (For similar looks, see Trend Alert: Tiled Kitchen Islands.) Amy and Christine chose concrete floors as a budget-friendly option.
a closeup of the tiled details. 19
Above: A closeup of the tiled details.

3. Create a grid.

a grid motif appears throughout the lobby, from the wood ceiling beams to the i 20
Above: A grid motif appears throughout the lobby, from the wood ceiling beams to the interior windows to the tiled bar. “It brings some order to the organization of the space,” says Christine.

4. Add multiple rugs to a big space.

instead of one massive area rug to fill the lobby, amy and christine dotted lot 21
Above: Instead of one massive area rug to fill the lobby, Amy and Christine dotted lots of mid-sized area rugs for a homey vibe. “We wanted it to feel more collected,” Christine explains. “We wanted it to feel like this was a mix of furniture from different living rooms and a little eclectic and a touch of bohemian.”

5. Consider carved wood.

the corner counter—one of many welcoming spots for guests to hang out&#x 22
Above: The corner counter—one of many welcoming spots for guests to hang out–features intricately carved wood legs, while rooms and doorways are edged in unpainted wood trim.

6. Mix patterns liberally.

for amy and christine, the key to mixing bold patterns—like the lobby ba 23
Above: For Amy and Christine, the key to mixing bold patterns—like the lobby bathroom’s wallpaper and checkerboard tile—was sticking to their earthy range of colors. “Keeping everything in nature-inspired tones really helped the patterns work with one another,” says Amy.

7. Try matte tile.

in the communal pantry, amy and christine created an eye catching backsplash wi 24
Above: In the communal pantry, Amy and Christine created an eye-catching backsplash with honed, textured Portobello America tiles in a deep sage hue. The matte finish combined with the green color feels unexpected and fresh.

8. Opt for micro-art.

amy and christine sourced over 600 pieces of art for the ozarker lodge—m 25
Above: Amy and Christine sourced over 600 pieces of art for The Ozarker Lodge—many of them tiny. All the items in the guest rooms are intentionally small, playing with scale and encouraging a closer look. “It’s a moment of discovery for the guests,” Christine says. “You have to get really close to it to see exactly what it is, which we think is fun. Whatever the object is, it triggers some sort of memory.”
most of the teensy art is vintage, from bingo cards and plates to needlepoints  26
Above: Most of the teensy art is vintage, from bingo cards and plates to needlepoints and erasers. “Anything we could get our hands on at thrift stores that was that little, we used,” says Christine. “Little photos, little matchbooks, little tins of mints that are 60 years old—objects that you wouldn’t normally think of as art.”

9. Accept orange peel.

&#8\2\20;orange peel&#8\2\2\1; walls are polarizing (read: most people  27
Above: “Orange peel” walls are polarizing (read: most people don’t like it), but Amy and Christine predict that textured walls will make a comeback, so they kept the existing finish. To work with what they had, they gave the walls a two-toned paint job, with navy blue on the bottom and creamy white on the top, and installed a chair rail for extra visual interest.

10. Incorporate Easter eggs.

kitschiness isn&#8\2\17;t amy and christine&#8\2\17;s style—so t 28
Above: Kitschiness isn’t Amy and Christine’s style—so they worked in the outdoorsy theme of the hotel in subtle ways instead. One example? The shower curtain in each of the bathrooms.
only on close inspection would a guest notice that the print is a compilation o 29
Above: Only on close inspection would a guest notice that the print is a compilation of destination-specific icons designed by the owners. “They created this really cool motif that includes a fire pit and some forest animals and some stars and moon that you could see a little bit clearer from the Ozarks,” Amy says.

For more Midwest design, see:

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Frequently asked questions

What is the Ozarker Lodge in Missouri?

The Ozarker Lodge is a design project located in Missouri, showcasing creative ideas for interior design and architecture.

Where can I find design ideas from the Ozarker Lodge?

You can find design ideas from the Ozarker Lodge on their official website or in the article mentioned on Remodelista.

What kind of design concepts are featured in the Ozarker Lodge?

The Ozarker Lodge features a blend of rustic and modern design concepts, incorporating natural materials and elements into contemporary layouts.

Are there specific ideas for each room in the lodge?

Yes, the Ozarker Lodge showcases design ideas for various rooms such as bedrooms, bathrooms, living areas, kitchens, and outdoor spaces.

Are there tips for incorporating eco-friendly elements into the design?

Yes, the Ozarker Lodge provides tips and inspiration for integrating sustainable and eco-friendly elements into the design, such as using reclaimed materials or energy-efficient fixtures.

Can I visit the Ozarker Lodge in person?

The availability of visiting the Ozarker Lodge in person may vary. It is recommended to check their website or contact them directly for any visitation opportunities.

Who is the designer behind the Ozarker Lodge project?

The designer behind the Ozarker Lodge project is not specifically mentioned in the linked article. It is advisable to visit their official website or contact them for more information.

Is there any contact information available to reach out for inquiries about the Ozarker Lodge?

Unfortunately, the provided article does not mention any specific contact information. It is best to refer to their official website or social media channels for any inquiries.

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