Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

Kitchen of the Week: A Glassmaker’s Imaginative Studio Kitchen in London, DIY Ikea Hacks Included

Search

Kitchen of the Week: A Glassmaker’s Imaginative Studio Kitchen in London, DIY Ikea Hacks Included

Kim Lightbody February 13, 2020

A look inside a maker’s studio almost always reveals far more than the artist’s craft; often, the space surrounding a workbench has been creatively adapted. Jochen Holz’s studio in Stratford, East London, is a case in point. Here, the German-born glassmaker—whose wonky, textured pieces and sculptural neon installations can be found at The New Craftsmen and Momosan Shop (you might also recognize them from our Trend Alert on two-tone glassware)—installed Ikea base cabinets and adapted them beyond recognition to create a kitchen unlike any we’ve seen. Join us for an exclusive look inside.

Photography by Kim Lightbody.

holz&#8\2\17;s kitchen occupies a corner of his studio in east london. 9
Above: Holz’s kitchen occupies a corner of his studio in East London.
the glassmaker in his kitchen. his workbench can be seen to the left of the ki 10
Above: The glassmaker in his kitchen. His workbench can be seen to the left of the kitchen.

Holz specializes in lamp working, which is a technique that transforms prefabricated borosilicate glass tubes into one-off pieces by melting the glass over a torch. The glass tubes are hardwearing and heat-resistant, which makes his unique pieces suitable for everyday use.

the backsplash is a sheet of painted glass, salvaged from an old project and gl 11
Above: The backsplash is a sheet of painted glass, salvaged from an old project and glued in place. A round industrial magnet serves as a utensil holder.
 holz affixed birch plywood fronts to ikea cabinets, giving each front a coat  12
Above: Holz affixed birch plywood fronts to Ikea cabinets, giving each front a coat of Osmo hardwax oil. (Holz mixed the oil with a touch of pink before applying.) Glass handles were made from colored glass rods in gray, teal blue, and pink. They are set into the plywood and glued with epoxy resin.
holz&#8\2\17;s collection of ceramics is mostly sourced from artesania de  13
Above: Holz’s collection of ceramics is mostly sourced from Artesania de Galicia in northern Spain.

The work surface was made from leftover pieces of Marmoleum, glued onto a birch plywood board edged with a solid maple timber strip. (For more on Marmoleum, see Remodeling 101: Affordable and Environmentally Friendly Linoleum.)

 holz&#8\2\17;s collection of drinks includes milk kefir, water kefir, and 14
Above: Holz’s collection of drinks includes milk kefir, water kefir, and green oolong from Taiwan, seen here brewing in one of his own textured glass pots.
holz&#8\2\17;s artfully utilitarian pieces line the shelves. 15
Above: Holz’s artfully utilitarian pieces line the shelves.
 bespoke hooks are screwed into the whitewashed, breeze block walls beneath a  16
Above: Bespoke hooks are screwed into the whitewashed, breeze-block walls beneath a prototype clock by Fabien Cappello.

Holz shares the studio with his partner, Attua Aparicio of Silo Studio. The couple made these hooks together, setting colored Jesmonite acrylic into glass.

a trailing vine fringes holz&#8\2\17;s open shelving system. 17
Above: A trailing vine fringes Holz’s open shelving system.

Prototypes and finished pieces are displayed in the studio beneath a thriving collection of indoor plants. The items made of clear glass have been given texture and shape through pressing the molten glass against various surfaces, such as burnt wood or perforated metal. “I wanted to get away from the idea that glass is this pristine material, to give it a bit more history and edge,” explains Holz.

a cluster of trump figurines. 18
Above: A cluster of Trump figurines.

The colored glass collection is made using an Italian technique known as incalmo. Much like a ceramist, he builds each piece by heating and fusing together colored pieces of glass. The end product is intentionally playful. “I don’t normally do figurative work,” explains Holz, “but I had fun making these Trumps. I found the quiff worked really well.”

For more studio inspiration, see 1,000 Square Feet on a Budget: An Artist’s Loft in North London. And for more maker’s kitchens, see:

N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on September 27, 2018.

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0