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Kitchen of the Week: deVol’s Urban Rustic Kitchen Gets a Glamorous Update

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Kitchen of the Week: deVol’s Urban Rustic Kitchen Gets a Glamorous Update

June 7, 2018

This isn’t the first time we’ve covered UK kitchen purveyor deVol‘s collaborative range with Brit woodworker Sebastian Cox, but the “urban rustic” line in a glamorous, period setting is new to us.

The range was first introduced in 2015 (see The Refined Rustic Kitchen, Sebastian Cox Edition for more), with its signature band-sawn, beechwood cabinetry—deVol’s most rustic look by far. When deVol creative director Helen Parker recently set out to display a Sebastian Cox kitchen in the company’s Regency-style townhouse showroom in London’s East End, she had to reconcile the line’s rough-hewn rusticity with the “more opulent, rich, and atmospheric” feeling of the period townhouse. She did it by using a traditional shade of blue on the modern cabinets, retaining the room’s original period details, and adding a cabinet from deVol’s perennially popular Real Shaker line for balance. The Sebastian Cox “rough-sawn cupboards may not at first glance seem to be the best choice for this house,” says Parker, “but the result is something quite spectacular.” Let’s take a look.

Photography courtesy of deVol.

Clerkenwell Blue is one of the most popular colors from the company&#8
Above: Clerkenwell Blue is one of the most popular colors from the company’s Real Shaker range. This room was already painted in the color, so Parker decided to try it as a stain on the Sebastian Cox cabinetry: “It’s lovely to see this shade as a more subtle wash of color so that the natural textures of the wood are still visible,” she says.
The kitchen has countertops made of a single sheet of copper (so no surface seams), with an integrated copper sink. The copper has a matte finish and a lightly pre-applied finish for patina.
Above: The kitchen has countertops made of a single sheet of copper (so no surface seams), with an integrated copper sink. The copper has a matte finish and a lightly pre-applied finish for patina.

Parker began her design with only a touch of copper hardware, but opted to install it throughout to add a “more reflective feel to a shady room.”

The brightness of the copper saves the cabinets from &#8
Above: The brightness of the copper saves the cabinets from “getting drowned in the strong architecture of the room,” says Parker. She also likes the material because it develops a beautiful patina over time.

A kitchen in the Sebastian Cox range starts at £15,000. Like all deVol kitchens, the line is handmade in the company’s workshop in Leicestershire, England.

 Parker worked the new kitchen into the existing decorative scheme of the room, which already included a chandelier, black-painted original wood floors, and a period fireplace. &#8
Above: Parker worked the new kitchen into the existing decorative scheme of the room, which already included a chandelier, black-painted original wood floors, and a period fireplace. “I’m a great believer in doing as little as possible if possible,” says Parker. “If the bones of something are good, then why would you spend time and money changing it just for the sake of it?”
The artwork throughout is by UK painter Rebecca Leigh and the plants are from Conservatory Archives. The appliances are Smeg.
Above: The artwork throughout is by UK painter Rebecca Leigh and the plants are from Conservatory Archives. The appliances are Smeg.

Parker likes kitchen walls and cabinetry to be the same color “to make a room feel less kitchen-y and more like a living space,” she says.

As a final decorative touch, Parker displays a range of black and dark green enamelware from Falcon; here, it hangs from an unpolished brass storage rail.
Above: As a final decorative touch, Parker displays a range of black and dark green enamelware from Falcon; here, it hangs from an unpolished brass storage rail.
The integrated copper sink. &#8
Above: The integrated copper sink. “When the window is open and you are standing at the sink, this kitchen feels intimate and cozy, yet still grand and authentic,” says Parker.
For wall cabinetry, Parker opted to install a London Glazed Wall Cupboard (£data-src=
Above: For wall cabinetry, Parker opted to install a London Glazed Wall Cupboard (£1,330) from the company’s Real Shaker range instead of a cupboard from the Sebastian Cox line: “We felt this room needed a much more substantial cupboard,” she says.
By adding a Real Shaker cabinet, Parker also wanted to remind homeowners that the various deVol lines are meant to be mixed.
Above: By adding a Real Shaker cabinet, Parker also wanted to remind homeowners that the various deVol lines are meant to be mixed.

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