Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

Kitchen of the Week: A Designer’s Deconstructed Sonoma Kitchen from Reclaimed Parts

Search

Kitchen of the Week: A Designer’s Deconstructed Sonoma Kitchen from Reclaimed Parts

January 19, 2023

File this under When the Whole Is Greater than the Sum of its Parts:

Ever since Julie first took a tour of San Francisco designer Charles de Lisle‘s reclaimed retreat in Sonoma (see: Off the Grid: A Stylish, Low-Impact Retreat in Sonoma by Charles de Lisle), we’ve been admiring how it manages to be simultaneously low-impact on the earth and high on style—putting to bed any notions that the eco-conscious can’t be aesthetically appealing.

Today we’re taking a closer look at de Lisle’s kitchen, made entirely from salvaged standalone pieces. Taken alone, each part—an old laundry sink, a reclaimed work table—might not seem like much. But with de Lisle’s discerning eye they’re transformed into something fresh and efficient.

Photography by Eric Petschek.

the retreat, which de lisle shares with his partner, studio volpe designer ralp 9
Above: The retreat, which de Lisle shares with his partner, Studio Volpe designer Ralph Dennis, is made up almost entirely of reclaimed and eco-conscious parts: plywood cladding, vintage windows salvaged from an Air Force base, and solar panels on the roof. The light-filled main room has a sitting area and Jøtul stove on one end.
at the other end is the efficient kitchen, stripped of the extraneous but not o 10
Above: At the other end is the efficient kitchen, stripped of the extraneous but not of style. The cast-concrete laundry sink was repurposed from the original cabin, paired with a no-fuss stainless steel work table from Grainger that houses a cooktop and toaster oven. The wall-mounted faucet is from Kohler, and the dining table is a vintage workbench originally rescued by de Lisle’s father. A plywood shelf overhead frames the workspace and holds ceramics.
the fridge was repurposed from de lisle&#8\2\17;s san francisco workspace a 11
Above: The fridge was repurposed from de Lisle’s San Francisco workspace and given a makeover. Fronted entirely in plywood, it takes on the look of a built-in cabinet.
for a full tour of the off grid retreat—including the japanese cedar soa 12
Above: For a full tour of the off-grid retreat—including the Japanese cedar soaking tub for bathing al fresco—see Off the Grid: A Stylish, Low-Impact Retreat in Sonoma by Charles de Lisle.

And for more off-grid kitchens—and houses—we like, see:

You need to login or register to view and manage your bookmarks.

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0