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Remodelista Reconnaissance: The Nautical Brass Ceiling Light

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Remodelista Reconnaissance: The Nautical Brass Ceiling Light

March 22, 2024

Interiors stylist Brittany Albert left much well enough alone in her Connecticut kitchen, and instead deployed cost-conscious tweaks to artfully transform an uninspired space: see The Cosmetic Kitchen Upgrade, Trade Secrets Included.

We originally presented Brittany’s kitchen a year ago and revisited it last month, and the queries kept coming on the one detail we hadn’t covered: where did those pleasingly simple overhead lights come from? We ourselves had been looking for months: it turns out the world is filled with flush-mount nautical lighting of the sort, seemingly all of it, unlike Brittany’s version, a bit too big, too refined, too brash, or too pricey.

Then, unaware of our search, Remodelista reader Brett MacFadden, of SF graphic design firm MacFadden & Thorpe, did his own hunt. Thank you, Brett, we think you found the light.

The Sighting

the ceiling lights are strategically placed in several spots on the ceiling of  17
Above: The ceiling lights are strategically placed in several spots on the ceiling of Brittany’s kitchen, set in an 1880s Connecticut farmhouse that’s been updated many times over the decades. Photograph by *Kate Jordan.
brittany plans to eventually replace the existing appliances, but since they we 18
Above: Brittany plans to eventually replace the existing appliances, but since they were in working condition—and she had a whole house to renovate—she decided to keep them in place while treating the room to some styling upgrades. These included brightening and warming the space with low-key touches of brass: the new cabinet knobs, light switch plates, and bridge faucet—for these details go to Brittany Albert’s Cosmetic Kitchen Upgrade—and yes, also the ceiling lights. Photograph by *Kate Jordan.

The Source

the battersea wall/ceiling light from uk lighting co felix seems a perfect matc 19
Above: The Battersea Wall/Ceiling Light from UK lighting co Felix seems a perfect match.
felix&#8\2\17;s battersea light is £\2\20—and the especially go 20
Above: Felix’s Battersea Light is £220—and the especially good news is that US and Canadian wiring is available on request.

Some runner-up flush-mount brass ceiling lights to consider—if only to give you more appreciation for the Battersea: the Vintage Maritime Brass Ceiling Lights, $218, from Etsy seller Big Ship Salvage; Original BTC’s Miniature Ship’s Well Glass Ceiling Light, $675;  the Bower Surface Mount, $349, from Schoolhouse; Edison Light Globes’s Small Brass Flush-Mout Light, $240 AUD; and the Brass Capsule Light, ¥14,300, from R-Toolbox of Tokyo.

And thank you to the Remodelista reader who tipped us off about Shiplights of Marblehead, MA, and its solid-brass nautical brass lighting: have a look at its Open Flush Bulkhead Light; $295.

Go to the Remodelista Reconnaissance archive for more design sleuthing, including:

*Kate Jordan’s photographs in this post are licensed for Remodelista’s use, and cannot be repurposed or used on any other website without the photographer’s explicit permission.

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