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Kitchen of the Week: A Communal Kitchen/Library at the Jennings Hotel

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Kitchen of the Week: A Communal Kitchen/Library at the Jennings Hotel

September 26, 2019

Previously we featured the five-room, Kickstarter-funded Jennings Hotel (see Labor of Love: The Jennings Hotel in Joseph, Oregon). Today we take a closer look at its communal kitchen and library, jointly designed by Matt Pierce of Wood & Faulk and Ben Klebba of Phloem Studio, both in Portland, Oregon.

Hotel guests use the light-filled room for reading, listening to records, cooking, and engaging in conversation—”all the things I hoped would happen and more,” said hotel owner Greg Hennes. “It’s been a dream to see community and friendship develop around the space.”

Photography by and courtesy of Greg Hennes.

The kitchen is anchored by custom oak cabinets by Phloem Studio, topped with quartz countertops. On the back wall are two Hand-Painted Yellow Cutting Boards by M. Crow & Co., suspended from oxidized cherry hanging pucks with leather cord.
Above: The kitchen is anchored by custom oak cabinets by Phloem Studio, topped with quartz countertops. On the back wall are two Hand-Painted Yellow Cutting Boards by M. Crow & Co., suspended from oxidized cherry hanging pucks with leather cord.
 The lights above the kitchen are Rejuvenation&#8
Above: The lights above the kitchen are Rejuvenation’s Rose City Six-Inch Pendants with 14-Inch Eastmoreland Shades. The trash can is from Rubbermaid’s Defenders line.

The plates, bowls, and cups are a mix of garage-sale finds and work by Portland ceramicist Addy Kessler. The open shelves are made of fir planks with off-the-shelf brackets.
Above: The plates, bowls, and cups are a mix of garage-sale finds and work by Portland ceramicist Addy Kessler. The open shelves are made of fir planks with off-the-shelf brackets.

Hanging from S-hooks on a simple brass rod: a Hand-Painted Cutting Board With Bronze Hook from M. Crow & Co., garage-sale mugs, and an Iris Hantverk Horsehair Handle Brush.
Above: Hanging from S-hooks on a simple brass rod: a Hand-Painted Cutting Board With Bronze Hook from M. Crow & Co., garage-sale mugs, and an Iris Hantverk Horsehair Handle Brush.
The communal oak dining table is a custom piece by Phloem Studio, surrounded by Tolix Marais Armchairs.
Above: The communal oak dining table is a custom piece by Phloem Studio, surrounded by Tolix Marais Armchairs.
Over the dining table hangs Rejuvenation&#8
Above: Over the dining table hangs Rejuvenation’s Haleigh Eight-Inch Three-Light Multipendant in gloss white. Falcon Ceiling Fans keep the air moving.

A sharing library of books and records sits on shelves of locally milled fir with brackets by Phloem Studio.
Above: A sharing library of books and records sits on shelves of locally milled fir with brackets by Phloem Studio.

Before

 When Hennes first viewed the building in , several years before he bought it, the ceilings had been dropped to 8.5 feet high and a wall divided the kitchen from the rest of the room.
Above: When Hennes first viewed the building in 2010, several years before he bought it, the ceilings had been dropped to 8.5 feet high and a wall divided the kitchen from the rest of the room.
They demolished the kitchen; it had been poorly constructed and only the plumbing was usable.
Above: They demolished the kitchen; it had been poorly constructed and only the plumbing was usable.
Hennes had the ceilings raised to a height of data-src=
Above: Hennes had the ceilings raised to a height of 12 feet.

See more Pacific Northwest kitchens in Rehab Diaries: An Oregon Kitchen with a Dose of Downton Abbey and Scandi in Seattle: A Midcentury Makeover with Lots of Affordable Ideas.

N.B. This post is an update; the original story ran on July 21, 2016.

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