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Rock Camp: A Classic/Minimal Lake Cabin in Maine by an Up-and-Coming Architect

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Rock Camp: A Classic/Minimal Lake Cabin in Maine by an Up-and-Coming Architect

August 13, 2021

Tucked into tall, wild woods on the shores of Mooselookmeguntic Lake in Maine’s Rangeley Lakes region is an unusual series of cabins—one cabin, really, made up of many small rooms. The first is what one might expect to find there: an old, classic one-room log house set under the pines. But to one side is a streamlined, Scandinavian-esque extension with two peaks, sided with Eastern white cedar, the work of Maine-based architect Jocelyn Dickson.

As it happens, this place—called Rock Camp—is Jocie’s family’s retreat. “This home belongs to my parents and someday in the future will hopefully belong to myself and my four siblings,” Jocie says. Her parents bought the property next door about 30 years ago, but with the family expanding, they jumped at the chance to purchase Rock Camp when the owners decided to sell.

When they bought it, Jocie says, “it was a historic one-room log cabin, with a lofted sleeping area over the living room and a basic kitchen and bath off the back. My parents’ goal was to create an addition so that a family, or two families, could have privacy and their own space while also remaining in proximity to the main house next door.” Jocie—who, coincidentally, had just moved home to Maine from New York City with her husband and young son—stepped in to design a clean-lined addition. “I quickly decided that I wanted to keep the new space somewhat separate and individual from the original cabin,” she says, “which allowed the log cabin to retain its historic quality, while the addition could be more contemporary.”

The lines are streamlined, yes, but even the extension is a nod to old Maine. The architecture references both the old log cabin “and the local vernacular of fishing camps in the area,” Jocie says, which traditionally have pitched roofs and a line of small cabins looking out at the lake. The lightly updated original log cabin serves as the compound’s mess hall and gathering space, with a dark-wood living area and a stripped-back kitchen redone by Jocie.

The result is just what a Maine cabin should be: old-school and simple, set into the landscape, with quilts on the beds and generous windows looking out at the lake. Join us for a look.

Photography by Greta Rybus exclusively for Remodelista.*

the series of cabins, tucked into the woods, with the original cabin at right a 9
Above: The series of cabins, tucked into the woods, with the original cabin at right and the extension at left.
because the extension is clean lined by design, jocie chose the few components  10
Above: Because the extension is clean-lined by design, Jocie chose the few components with care. “The material palette is simple and restrained,” she says. The exterior is a combination of matte black standing-seam metal roofing—which continues as siding in places—and eastern white cedar, grown and milled in Maine, which “allows the cabin to blend into the surrounding forest.”
tall, thin windows offer glimpses of the trees as one passes from room to room. 11
Above: Tall, thin windows offer glimpses of the trees as one passes from room to room.
one of two bedrooms in the extension, each with a high peaked ceiling and a wal 12
Above: One of two bedrooms in the extension, each with a high peaked ceiling and a wall of glass looking out at the lake. “The interior is clad entirely in pine,” Jocie says, which “allows one to focus on the beautiful views of the forest and the lake beyond.”
a built in pine shelf serves as a bedside table. 13
Above: A built-in pine shelf serves as a bedside table.
the other of the two bedrooms, with a quilt for chilly nights. there&#8\2\1 14
Above: The other of the two bedrooms, with a quilt for chilly nights. There’s also a sleeping loft and a bathroom.
collected art and a clutch of flowers. 15
Above: Collected art and a clutch of flowers.
an open breezeway leads between rooms. 16
Above: An open breezeway leads between rooms.
into the old cabin. here, &#8\2\20;we removed the sleeping loft, which allo 17
Above: Into the old cabin. Here, “we removed the sleeping loft, which allows more light to enter and creates a more spacious feeling,” says Jocie. And the original kitchen got a revamp to be more functional as the central cook space for the family camp.
&#8\2\20;the range and sink are both original, and the boards that line the 18
Above: “The range and sink are both original, and the boards that line the kitchen walls were salvaged from the loft,” adds Jocie. “The simple cabinetry was custom built by our wonderful contractor and friend, George, and his team. My mom found the vintage cabinet hardware on eBay.”
the one room original cabin, which serves as a summer gathering space. 19
Above: The one-room original cabin, which serves as a summer gathering space.
much of the furniture in the log cabin came with the place: &#8\2\20;it& 20
Above: Much of the furniture in the log cabin came with the place: “It’s a combination of the original furnishings and pieces that my parents brought over from next door,” Jocelyn says.
a writing desk tucked in one corner; wall hooks alongside corral extra wraps an 21
Above: A writing desk tucked in one corner; wall hooks alongside corral extra wraps and throws.
the cabin is filled with well loved reads and a collection of oil lamps. 22
Above: The cabin is filled with well-loved reads and a collection of oil lamps.
vintage maine essentials. 23
Above: Vintage Maine essentials.
jocelyn and her son kick back with a carton of blueberries on the cabin&#8\ 24
Above: Jocelyn and her son kick back with a carton of blueberries on the cabin’s old porch.
a glimpse of the original cabin&#8\2\17;s lakeside exterior, built into the 25
Above: A glimpse of the original cabin’s lakeside exterior, built into the boulders.
down to the water. 26
Above: Down to the water.
the cabin&#8\2\17;s dock, set for an afternoon swim. 27
Above: The cabin’s dock, set for an afternoon swim.
out on the lake. 28
Above: Out on the lake.

*Photos may not be displayed or reproduced without express written permission by Remodelista.

Take a look inside a few more cabins, redone:

N.B.: This post has been updated with additional images; the original story ran on September 28, 2020.

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