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Kitchen of the Week: Hudson Valley Farmhouse Kitchen Reborn

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Kitchen of the Week: Hudson Valley Farmhouse Kitchen Reborn

August 22, 2019

A while back we dropped in on artist Dunja Von Stoddard’s 1880s farmhouse in Rhinebeck, New York, and especially admired the kitchen. Dunja recently tweaked the space, so on a trip to the Hudson Valley, I stopped by to take another look. The kitchen may appear to be historic (exposed beams, wide-plank floors, soapstone counters), but it’s the result of an extensive and painstaking restoration.

When Dunja purchased the home, most of its the historic charm had been obscured by some ill-conceived Reagan-era edits. “My mother and my realtor thought I was crazy to buy it,” Dunja admitted. With red faux-terracotta floors and a drop ceiling, the kitchen was particularly unfortunate. After tearing everything down to the studs, Dunja and architect Kathryn Whitman of design-build firm Quatrefoil worked to re-create a much more authentic modern farmhouse kitchen.

Photography for Remodelista by Justine Hand.

Dunja’s mission was to enhance the sense of light and air in the small space. To maximize the ceiling height and reintroduce some historic context, Dunja removed a drop ceiling to expose the farmhouse’s original beams. Interspersed between the beams are a suite of Hannah Medium Semi-Flush Mount lights from Rejuvenation Hardware.
Above: Dunja’s mission was to enhance the sense of light and air in the small space. To maximize the ceiling height and reintroduce some historic context, Dunja removed a drop ceiling to expose the farmhouse’s original beams. Interspersed between the beams are a suite of Hannah Medium Semi-Flush Mount lights from Rejuvenation Hardware.
To achieve a more open feel and introduce some warmer tones, Dunja replaced overhead cabinets with open shelves made of pine.
Above: To achieve a more open feel and introduce some warmer tones, Dunja replaced overhead cabinets with open shelves made of pine.
Dunja replaced three small, central windows with four more generous specimens from Marvin, which now frame a NXR stove and make the most of the woodland view.
Above: Dunja replaced three small, central windows with four more generous specimens from Marvin, which now frame a NXR stove and make the most of the woodland view.
For the dramatic dark countertops, Dunja chose traditional soapstone from Barra & Trumbore in Kerhonkson, New York. Her wooden spoon installation is comprised of vintage pieces procured on Etsy and eBay. Dunja, who is a textile designer as well as a potter, made the soap dish.
Above: For the dramatic dark countertops, Dunja chose traditional soapstone from Barra & Trumbore in Kerhonkson, New York. Her wooden spoon installation is comprised of vintage pieces procured on Etsy and eBay. Dunja, who is a textile designer as well as a potter, made the soap dish.
Bounty from Dunja’s garden: Tomatoes and flowers add a bit of autumnal color. Against the wall rest a vintage cutting board, which Dunja bought at Brimfield, a two-toned marble board by Jonathan Adler, Hay’s Field Cutting Board (available at Finnish Design Shop; $60) and another smaller marble board from Hammertown in Rhinebeck. Leff’s Large Index Wall Clock is available at Lumens; $99.
Above: Bounty from Dunja’s garden: Tomatoes and flowers add a bit of autumnal color. Against the wall rest a vintage cutting board, which Dunja bought at Brimfield, a two-toned marble board by Jonathan Adler, Hay’s Field Cutting Board (available at Finnish Design Shop; $60) and another smaller marble board from Hammertown in Rhinebeck. Leff’s Large Index Wall Clock is available at Lumens; $99.
Dunja also removed a central island in favor of a U-shaped counter layout. (The tea towel on the countertop was designed by Dunja. Visit her her online shop, Doonyaya, for similar.) A cluster chandelier from Schoolhouse Electric illuminates the breakfast bar.
Above: Dunja also removed a central island in favor of a U-shaped counter layout. (The tea towel on the countertop was designed by Dunja. Visit her her online shop, Doonyaya, for similar.) A cluster chandelier from Schoolhouse Electric illuminates the breakfast bar.
Open shelving holds Dunja’s collection of dishes by Tivoli Tile Works. The geometric cheese boards are by Dunja (left) and Mbartstudios (right).
Above: Open shelving holds Dunja’s collection of dishes by Tivoli Tile Works. The geometric cheese boards are by Dunja (left) and Mbartstudios (right).
Winter’s bone: Dunja makes use of the sculptural forms of dead flowers.
Above: Winter’s bone: Dunja makes use of the sculptural forms of dead flowers.

Take the tour of Dunja’s entire farmhouse renovation: Hudson Valley Hues: At Home with an Inventive Textile Designer.

Get inspired with more of our favorite modern farmhouse kitchens:

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