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Color Explosion: Linens Imbued with Natural Plant Dyes

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Color Explosion: Linens Imbued with Natural Plant Dyes

April 7, 2020

It started with avocados. “Remember when people were dying fabric with the pits and skins, like, three or four years ago? I tried it and became so obsessed,” says Amanda de Beaufort about the genesis of A_DB Botanical Color, her collection of naturally dyed, hippie-chic textiles. From there, she branched out (pardon the pun) to other plants. “I was like a crazy person walking around the parks here looking for inspiration.”

“Here” is Maplewood, New Jersey (where I happen to live, too). We recently chatted about her line, which includes kitchen linens, pillow cases, as well as fashion items like socks and tees. “Almost every time, it’s a surprise,” says Amanda of her process, which requires heating up botanicals (sometimes over multiple sessions) and seeing what hues develop, then soaking fabrics in the dye (sometimes for a week) and again seeing what develops. A lot is left to chance—and that’s part of their appeal.

Amanda, who was a finalist in last year’s Etsy Design Awards, sells her line on her website and at various stores in the Northeast (including Meus, a store in our town and where I first discovered her work).

Here, some of our favorites from her online store.

Photography by Amanda de Beaufort.

Color Explosion Linens Imbued with Natural Plant Dyes All her products are one of a kind. These Organic Cotton Dinner Napkins are \$3\2 for \2.
Above: All her products are one-of-a-kind. These Organic Cotton Dinner Napkins are $32 for 2.
Color Explosion Linens Imbued with Natural Plant Dyes Not all of Amanda&#8\2\17;s dyed fabrics have that color bombed look. These solid colored Floursack Tea Towels are in more muted shades; \$36 for \2.
Above: Not all of Amanda’s dyed fabrics have that color-bombed look. These solid-colored Floursack Tea Towels are in more muted shades; $36 for 2.
Color Explosion Linens Imbued with Natural Plant Dyes These Bundle Dyed Linen Throw Pillows, featuring down inserts, were hand dyed with local flowers and natural dye extracts; \$80 each.
Above: These Bundle Dyed Linen Throw Pillows, featuring down inserts, were hand-dyed with local flowers and natural dye extracts; $80 each.
Above: Her Market Totes come in a variety of colors; $24 each.
Color Explosion Linens Imbued with Natural Plant Dyes Local parents are going crazy for these Botanical Dye Kits, which make for great kid friendly crafting; \$\2\2.
Above: Local parents are going crazy for these Botanical Dye Kits, which make for great kid-friendly crafting; $22.
Above: Peeks at her process: cotton bundled, tie-dye style, and a pot of red foliage and berries ready to brew (the resulting color was pink).

For more inspiring textiles, see:

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