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Color Explosion: Linens Imbued with Natural Plant Dyes

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Color Explosion: Linens Imbued with Natural Plant Dyes

April 7, 2020

It started with avocados. “Remember when people were dying fabric with the pits and skins, like, three or four years ago? I tried it and became so obsessed,” says Amanda de Beaufort about the genesis of A_DB Botanical Color, her collection of naturally dyed, hippie-chic textiles. From there, she branched out (pardon the pun) to other plants. “I was like a crazy person walking around the parks here looking for inspiration.”

“Here” is Maplewood, New Jersey (where I happen to live, too). We recently chatted about her line, which includes kitchen linens, pillow cases, as well as fashion items like socks and tees. “Almost every time, it’s a surprise,” says Amanda of her process, which requires heating up botanicals (sometimes over multiple sessions) and seeing what hues develop, then soaking fabrics in the dye (sometimes for a week) and again seeing what develops. A lot is left to chance—and that’s part of their appeal.

Amanda, who was a finalist in last year’s Etsy Design Awards, sells her line on her website and at various stores in the Northeast (including Meus, a store in our town and where I first discovered her work).

Here, some of our favorites from her online store.

Photography by Amanda de Beaufort.

All her products are one-of-a-kind. These Organic Cotton Dinner Napkins are $3
Above: All her products are one-of-a-kind. These Organic Cotton Dinner Napkins are $32 for 2.
Not all of Amanda&#8
Above: Not all of Amanda’s dyed fabrics have that color-bombed look. These solid-colored Floursack Tea Towels are in more muted shades; $36 for 2.
These Bundle Dyed Linen Throw Pillows, featuring down inserts, were hand-dyed with local flowers and natural dye extracts; $80 each.
Above: These Bundle Dyed Linen Throw Pillows, featuring down inserts, were hand-dyed with local flowers and natural dye extracts; $80 each.
Above: Her Market Totes come in a variety of colors; $24 each.
Local parents are going crazy for these Botanical Dye Kits, which make for great kid-friendly crafting; $
Above: Local parents are going crazy for these Botanical Dye Kits, which make for great kid-friendly crafting; $22.
Above: Peeks at her process: cotton bundled, tie-dye style, and a pot of red foliage and berries ready to brew (the resulting color was pink).

For more inspiring textiles, see:

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