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DIY: Wire Garland from Found Objects

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DIY: Wire Garland from Found Objects

Alexa Hotz August 06, 2013

By now, you probably know about my obsession with the work and lifestyle of French ceramicist Cécile Daladier; while visiting her in the south of Paris this past spring, a delicate, decorated loop of wire in the corner of her studio caught my eye.

Daladier made her garland from a utilitarian loop of wire from the hardware store that she flecked with tiny scraps of fabric. Her project made me suddenly remember a small cardboard box wedged in the back of my closet full of fabric scraps (the result of an ill-fated project I undertook a couple of years ago in which I pulled apart a ratty vintage quilt). Now I know what to do with those scraps!  

Much like Daladier’s tree branch decorated in pieces of (attractive) plastic as a political statement about refuse and trees in Paris, the wire garland is her way of turning scraps into art–which, if you ask me, is the sign of a true artist.

Above: Photograph by Natalie Weiss for Remodelista.

Above: Each garland has its own predetermined color palette; this one is a mixture of red, pink, and tan with a few unexpected pieces of black fabric threaded in between. Photograph by Alexa Hotz for Remodelista.

Above: Daladier unfurls the garland to display its impressive length. She describes how she’ll use it as everyday decor, for parties and other events, and during the holidays. Photograph by Alexa Hotz for Remodelista.

See more house and studio visits in Paris via Travels with an Editor: Paris.

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