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MexChic Within Reach: Our 13 Favorite Online Sources for South-of-the-Border Style

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MexChic Within Reach: Our 13 Favorite Online Sources for South-of-the-Border Style

March 16, 2017

In search of a little south-of-the-border style, but no time to travel? Take a virtual flight via one of these online sources featuring home goods made in Mexico (most have a sustainability/social mission as well).

Studio de la O

 Studio de la O is known for its elegantly simple handmade goods, including this Glass Handleless Pitcher with Leather Sleeve and Terracotta Dripper; $4.
Above: Studio de la O is known for its elegantly simple handmade goods, including this Glass Handleless Pitcher with Leather Sleeve and Terracotta Dripper; $194.

Evoke the Spirit

Founded by ex–New Yorker and artist Brittney Borjeson, Evoke the Spirit offers a range of brightly colored Mexican crafts, from Painted Cow Skulls ($7 and $loading=
Above: Founded by ex–New Yorker and artist Brittney Borjeson, Evoke the Spirit offers a range of brightly colored Mexican crafts, from Painted Cow Skulls ($725 and $1,225) by the Wixarika of the northern Sierra Madre Occidental Mountains to woven blankets from Oaxaca.

Non-Perishable Goods

In addition to her popular everyday napkins, Portland, Oregon, designer Shay Carrillo offers a number of handmade Mexican pieces in her online shop Non-Perishable Goods, including our favorite: Oaxacan Palm Baskets, available in a range of sizes.
Above: In addition to her popular everyday napkins, Portland, Oregon, designer Shay Carrillo offers a number of handmade Mexican pieces in her online shop Non-Perishable Goods, including our favorite: Oaxacan Palm Baskets, available in a range of sizes.

The Citizenry

 Carly Nance and Rachel Bentley&#8
Above: Carly Nance and Rachel Bentley’s company, The Citizenry, promotes the work of traditional artisans around the world, including many Mexican-made designs such as the Aldama Chair, an updated, leather version of Acapulco chair; $825.

Lost & Found

Our friend Jamie Rosenthal of Lost & Found in LA scours the globe looking for one-off and unusual pieces; we especially like her made-in-Mexico Bitters Roli Poli Glasses, $ each.
Above: Our friend Jamie Rosenthal of Lost & Found in LA scours the globe looking for one-off and unusual pieces; we especially like her made-in-Mexico Bitters Roli Poli Glasses, $15 each.

Materia

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Above: “Reimagining artisanal techniques for today’s lifestyle” is the motto at Materia, a Mexi/Cali concept store, which works with local craftsmen in Mexico to provide simple goods such as these  Loomed Kitchen Towels from Oaxaca; $36 a pair.

Santabelle

The Otomi Runner from Santabelle, a Sydney, Australia–based importer of Mexican textiles, is AUD $loading=
Above: The Otomi Runner from Santabelle, a Sydney, Australia–based importer of Mexican textiles, is AUD $125 ($96 USD).

Diario

Diario captures the spirit of Mexico with brightly colored, everyday goods made by artisans throughout the country. The Rectangular Golden Basket is made from embellished palm by artisans from Tlamacazapa; $65. See more at Diario in Mexico City: An Industrial Designer Reimagines South of the Border.
Above: Diario captures the spirit of Mexico with brightly colored, everyday goods made by artisans throughout the country. The Rectangular Golden Basket is made from embellished palm by artisans from Tlamacazapa; $65. See more at Diario in Mexico City: An Industrial Designer Reimagines South of the Border.

Chalupa

Named after the Aztec boat that carried goods throughout this ancient empire, Chalupa provides traditional Mexican crafts to the Japanese online community. The Small Blue Rug is designed by Mexican design brand Lagos del Mundo; ¥,0 ($3).
Above: Named after the Aztec boat that carried goods throughout this ancient empire, Chalupa provides traditional Mexican crafts to the Japanese online community. The Small Blue Rug is designed by Mexican design brand Lagos del Mundo; ¥16,200 ($143).

Vía Raíz

 Working with skilled local artisans and innovative designers, Vía Raíz brings traditional Mexican craft to the modern audience. Some of our favorites include Puff Blanket from Central Mexico ($340) and Lagos Del Mundo&#8
Above: Working with skilled local artisans and innovative designers, Vía Raíz brings traditional Mexican craft to the modern audience. Some of our favorites include Puff Blanket from Central Mexico ($340) and Lagos Del Mundo’s Clay Pitcher with Cup; $100.

Maison Numen

Maison Numen offers an expansive collection of traditional crafts from across the globe, including textiles and home goods from Mexico. Here, Wooden Plates are made are crafted by Yucatecan artisans from southeastern Mexico; $55.
Above: Maison Numen offers an expansive collection of traditional crafts from across the globe, including textiles and home goods from Mexico. Here, Wooden Plates are made are crafted by Yucatecan artisans from southeastern Mexico; $55.

JM Dry Goods

JM Dry Goods in Marfa, Texas, offers a range of household goods from Mexico. Photograph by Michael Muller.
Above: JM Dry Goods in Marfa, Texas, offers a range of household goods from Mexico. Photograph by Michael Muller.

L’Aviva Home

From Laura Aviva, the former creative director for Travel & Leisure magazine, L&#8
Above: From Laura Aviva, the former creative director for Travel & Leisure magazine, L’Aviva Home showcases traditional crafts from around the world, including textiles from Mexico. Among our favorite are these hand-knotted Temoayan Blankets; $345 to $465.
Some of our favorite Mexican brands to search for while you shop:

Product summary  

Blankets, Throws, & Quilts

Puff Blanket

$340.00 USD from Vía Raíz

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