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7 Favorite Architect-Approved Sources for Subway Tile

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7 Favorite Architect-Approved Sources for Subway Tile

January 10, 2019

Whether it’s in the kitchen, bathroom, or another hardworking space in your home, you can’t go wrong with a classic subway tile. For us, it’s like the tile equivalent to a coat of white paint—a clean, fresh upgrade that looks good almost anywhere, with any architectural style. But, like the seemingly endless varieties of white paint (warm, cool, gallery, you get the picture), there are almost infinite interations of subway tiles, each with their own nuances. It made us wonder: What subway tiles do architects source for their clients again and again? To get the answer, we polled the members of our Architect/Designer Directory; here’s what they had to say:

Nemo Metro Wall Tile

7 Favorite ArchitectApproved Sources for Subway Tile Nemo&#8\2\17;s Metro Wall tile in Ultra White lines the tub surround and shower walls in a bright white bath. Photograph by Haris Kenjar.
Above: Nemo’s Metro Wall tile in Ultra White lines the tub surround and shower walls in a bright white bath. Photograph by Haris Kenjar.

Fireclay Tile

7 Favorite ArchitectApproved Sources for Subway Tile Mowery Marsh Architects installed Fireclay&#8\2\17;s 3&#\2\15;\1\2 tile as a kitchen backsplash. Photograph by Haris Kenjar.
Above: Mowery Marsh Architects installed Fireclay’s 3×12 tile as a kitchen backsplash. Photograph by Haris Kenjar.

“Nemo Metro Wall tile… it’s the most economical we’ve found! For a more crisp edge we like Ann Sacks Kanso and for a handmade subway tile in varying sizes we often use Fireclay.” – Jennifer Marsh, Mowery Marsh Architects

Heath Ceramics

7 Favorite ArchitectApproved Sources for Subway Tile Herringbone Design used Heath Ceramics&#8\2\17; Classic Field tile in Jade for the bar backsplash of The Clubhouse Bar at Tara Iti Golf Club in New Zealand. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds.
Above: Herringbone Design used Heath Ceramics’ Classic Field tile in Jade for the bar backsplash of The Clubhouse Bar at Tara Iti Golf Club in New Zealand. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds.

“Our favorite source for subway tile is Heath Ceramics. Depending on your selection, their Classic Field tile has different degrees of color variation, but it is in these color variations that a sense of depth, warmth and visual interest is found. Just make sure you have an installer that understands the concept of color modulation.” – Jeffrey Botwin & Philip Howlett, Herringbone Design

Adds Jute Home‘s Alison Davin on Heath Ceramics subway tile: “We love that it is handmade and has variation.”

Waterworks Architectonics

7 Favorite ArchitectApproved Sources for Subway Tile Designer Kriste Michelini used Waterworks&#8\2\17; Architectonics tile in a herringbone pattern for a kitchen backsplash.
Above: Designer Kriste Michelini used Waterworks’ Architectonics tile in a herringbone pattern for a kitchen backsplash.

Sonoma Tilemakers

7 Favorite ArchitectApproved Sources for Subway Tile Photograph courtesy of Sonoma Tilemakers.
Above: Photograph courtesy of Sonoma Tilemakers.

“The glazed subway tiles from Waterworks are my go-to. They come in many shades and are a timeless look. For budget-focused projects, we turn to Sonoma Tilemakers. It is an excellent value and offers quick ship options.” – Kriste Michelini, Kriste Michelini Interiors

Subway Ceramics

7 Favorite ArchitectApproved Sources for Subway Tile Classic white subway tiles line the walls of a bathroom. Photograph courtesy of Subway Ceramics.
Above: Classic white subway tiles line the walls of a bathroom. Photograph courtesy of Subway Ceramics.

“We’re partial to Subway Ceramics through Heritage Collections. The edges are perfectly square so the grout line is always crisp and straight.” – Jayne and Joan Michaels, 2Michaels

Equipe Masia Collection

7 Favorite ArchitectApproved Sources for Subway Tile Equipe&#8\2\17;s Masia tile in Jade. Photograph courtesy of Equipe.
Above: Equipe’s Masia tile in Jade. Photograph courtesy of Equipe.

“A terrific subway tile is the Masia Collection by Equipe in Spain, which comes in 9 colors.” – Rose Carlson, Burr and McCallum Architects

More tile inspiration:

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