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To Stay! 13 Caffeine Stations for the Home

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To Stay! 13 Caffeine Stations for the Home

January 15, 2024

The pantry was once considered the pinnacle of kitchen design—with attention on how neatly obscure grains are stored. But this year, it’s all about the at-home caffeine station.

“Increasingly, the kitchens we create need to house a high specification artillery of coffee making equipment,” says Toby Hall, founder of the British kitchen company Inglis Hall. “Which means the dedicated home barista station or coffee shrine—call it what you will—is here, and we love it.”

It isn’t all about the gadgetry, though. Hall explains: “The thing that counts most is the ritual surrounding it: the space it creates in your day, the burble of liquid or the flicker of a blue flame. When we design with a ritual in mind, new possibilities open up.”

Here are a few caffeine shrines we’ve been admiring lately.

inglis hall created this simple niche within reach of the kitchen table. ȁ 17
Above: Inglis Hall created this simple niche within reach of the kitchen table. “However you take your coffee, make it count,” says Hall. “It needn’t require an extravagant budget—it’s far more important to engage your imagination and invest in the ritual. A warm fireside nook, a favored chair strategically placed to harvest the morning sun…” Photograph by Inglis Hall.
in femte til venstre: a danish couple’s thoughtfully appointed house in  18
Above: In Femte Til Venstre: A Danish Couple’s Thoughtfully Appointed House in Copenhagen, the homeowners appointed a pale wood built-in as coffee station, topped with a marble scrap the couple found in the attic.
if there are no nooks available, a dedicated work surface area with shelf space 19
Above: If there are no nooks available, a dedicated work surface area with shelf space above will suffice, as seen here in another Inglis Hall project. Photograph by Inglis Hall.
a hideaway espresso station in kitchen of the week: sunshine and storage aplent 20
Above: A hideaway espresso station in Kitchen of the Week: Sunshine and Storage Aplenty in a Tiny Vancouver Remodel.
okay, so this is more of a tea shrine, but the principle is the same. in this i 21
Above: Okay, so this is more of a tea shrine, but the principle is the same. In this instance, all tea-drinking paraphernalia has been corralled in the vintage cabinet above. Design and photography by British Standard by Plain English.
a niche in the wall becomes a recessed coffee setup in this devol design. note  22
Above: A niche in the wall becomes a recessed coffee setup in this deVOL design. Note the proximity to the stove for handy top-ups. Photograph by deVOL.
a british standard tea station is conveniently wedged between the aga and the f 23
Above: A British Standard tea station is conveniently wedged between the Aga and the fridge in the home of Lisa Mehydene, founder of edit58. Photograph by British Standard by Plain English.
this discrete niche keeps caffeine related clutter clear of the main work surfa 24
Above: This discrete niche keeps caffeine-related clutter clear of the main work surface. Design and photograph by Pluck.
uncommon projects designed this &#8\2\20;pocket door breakfast bar&#8\2 25
Above: Uncommon Projects designed this “pocket door breakfast bar” for clients who wanted to keep their habit hidden. “A cupboard like this is really practical as it means all the equipment can be kept out of sight when not in use, whilst warm, recessed LED lighting creates a focal point at that end of the room,” explains founder Alan Drumm.  Photograph by Jocelyn Low.
wine and coffee have been grouped together in this pluck design, which provides 26
Above: Wine and coffee have been grouped together in this Pluck design, which provides an enticing buffer between the kitchen and living space. Photograph by Pluck.
remodelista editor julie&#8\2\17;s own at home coffee setup in her brooklyn 27
Above: Remodelista editor Julie’s own at-home coffee setup in her Brooklyn galley kitchen. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Remodelista; see more in Before/After: A Remodelista’s Refreshed Parlor Floor Flat in Brooklyn Heights, NY.
if space permits, a free standing caffeine setup will show how serious your dev 28
Above: If space permits, a free-standing caffeine setup will show how serious your devotion is. Design and photograph by deVOL.
a free standing barista station that means business by inglis hall. photograph  29
Above: A free-standing barista station that means business by Inglis Hall. Photograph by Inglis Hall.

For more kitchen trends of the moment, see:

N.B. This post originally ran on February 8, 2023, and has been updated.

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Frequently asked questions

What is a coffee barista station?

A coffee barista station is a designated area within your home where you can create and enjoy professional-grade coffee drinks.

What are the benefits of having a coffee barista station at home?

Having a coffee barista station at home allows you to save time and money on trips to coffee shops, as well as giving you the opportunity to experiment with different coffee flavors and styles.

What equipment do I need to set up a coffee barista station at home?

You will need a coffee machine (espresso or drip), a grinder, a milk frother, a selection of syrups, and a variety of coffee beans.

Where should I set up my coffee barista station?

Ideally, you should set up your coffee barista station in a designated area of your kitchen, with access to water and electricity.

How can I decorate my coffee barista station?

You can add decorative elements such as plants, artwork, and shelving to your coffee barista station to create a cozy, inviting atmosphere.

How do I clean my coffee barista station?

Proper cleaning of your coffee machine, grinder, and frother is essential to maintain the quality of your coffee and ensure the longevity of your equipment. Refer to your equipment's user manual for specific cleaning instructions.

What are some coffee barista station design ideas?

Some popular coffee barista station design ideas include using open shelving to display coffee mugs and equipment, adding a chalkboard or menu board to showcase specialty drinks, and incorporating a small sink for easy clean-up.

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