Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

A Legendary Provincetown Artist’s Home, Updated for Modern Life

Search

A Legendary Provincetown Artist’s Home, Updated for Modern Life

November 9, 2020

If you’ve spent time in Provincetown in the last few decades, you know about Ciro Cozzi. An artist, bon vivant, and c0-owner of Ciro & Sal’s Restaurant, he was a beloved figure in town (when he died in 2013, Anthony Bourdain tweeted “RIP Ciro Cozzi, my first real boss of bosses in long ago Provincetown, Mass.”). For years he lived with his family in a rambling home consisting of three structures cobbled together, the front a “float-over” from Long Point, a mid 19th century section, and a grand Colonial Revival addition.

When a local couple bought the house after Ciro’s death, his nephew Philip Cozzi of Hein + Cozzi, the Provincetown design firm, took the lead. According to Philip’s wife and partner Kristin Hein, “Philip was the spirit guide—he spent, or misspent—every summer of his teenage years housed in the attic with his miscreant cousins, working at his uncle’s restaurant.

“When it came to restoration, we were all aligned in honoring the home by keeping the existing foot print as well as all original beams and millwork. The task at hand was to update the necessities: bathrooms, kitchens, and lighting.” Kristin imbued the home with “a moody yet masculine color palette,” as she calls it. “We used Farrow & Ball’s ‘Mole’s Breath’ as a common thread for millwork and trim, ‘Railings’ (a dark blue-black) for all doors, and ‘Pavilion Grey/Clunch’ on walls and ceilings. Window treatments were kept simple: rough burlap fabric hung on boat cleats, sheerer in public areas and thicker in bedrooms, and wooden venetian blinds with black tape in halls and bathrooms.”

Join us for a tour:

Photography by Justine Hand.

The exterior is painted &#8
Above: The exterior is painted “Winter Sky” from Fine Paints of Europe, and the door and trim is “Railings” from Farrow & Ball. The blackened copper Ravenspoint Lanterns are from The Urban Electric Company.
The wide planked original King wood pine floors were refinished to tone down the yellow, &#8
Above: The wide planked original King wood pine floors were refinished to tone down the yellow, “It was a group experiment,” Kristin says. “We ended up using one part Rustoleum Sunbleached to half a part Minwax White Wash, and then we finished with Bona HD Traffic Commercial Extra Matte.”
Philip and Kristin mounted an oar as handrail, adding a dash of color to the entryway.
Above: Philip and Kristin mounted an oar as handrail, adding a dash of color to the entryway.
The grouse linen “Trophy Heads” wall sculpture over the fireplace is by Truro, MA, artist Breon Dunigan.
Above: The grouse linen “Trophy Heads” wall sculpture over the fireplace is by Truro, MA, artist Breon Dunigan.
&#8 Above: “We had to open up a side entrance to get the grand piano in the house,” Kristin says. The walls are painted in Farrow & Ball’s “Pavilion Gray,” and the trim and millwork is Farrow & Ball “Mole’s Breath.” The small painting is by Provincetown artist John Dowd. The linen curtain fabric is from Rogers & Goffigon.

&#8
Above: “The pine cabinetry was sanded and left raw and natural,” Kristin says. The Clear Jug Pendant is from Cisco.
The backsplash is tiled in 6-by-6-inch Subway Tile in khaki from Heritage Tile. The counters are soapstone and the range is from Thermidor.
Above: The backsplash is tiled in 6-by-6-inch Subway Tile in khaki from Heritage Tile. The counters are soapstone and the range is from Thermidor.
The ceramic pendant is original to the house.
Above: The ceramic pendant is original to the house.
 The glass vase is from John Derian&#8
Above: The glass vase is from John Derian’s Provincetown shop.
 &#8
Above: “We kept the window treatments simple, in keeping with the informality of the fishing village of Provincetown,” Kristin says.
A bedroom papered in Farrow & Ball&#8
Above: A bedroom papered in Farrow & Ball’s Silvergate
The curtain fabric is Exbury Flax from J. Samuel.
Above: The curtain fabric is Exbury Flax from J. Samuel.
The wall-mounted Vero sink is from Duravit and the bath fixtures are Waterworks Highgate in brass.
Above: The wall-mounted Vero sink is from Duravit and the bath fixtures are Waterworks Highgate in brass.

Studio

A wall of windows filters abundant daylight into the studio.
Above: A wall of windows filters abundant daylight into the studio.
Kitchen colanders serve as light fixtures and date to Ciro Cozzi&#8
Above: Kitchen colanders serve as light fixtures and date to Ciro Cozzi’s era.

For more Provincetown projects by Hein + Cozzi, see:

Out at Sea: A Shipshape Renovation in Provincetown by Hein+Cozzi

Low-Key Luxury: The New Old Homestead in Provincetown

Before & After: A New Cape Cod Garden for the Old Homestead in Provincetown

Product summary  

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0