Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

Kitchen of the Week: A Suave, Minimalist Paris Kitchen with Indoor-Outdoor Dining

Search

Kitchen of the Week: A Suave, Minimalist Paris Kitchen with Indoor-Outdoor Dining

July 12, 2018

“The architect-client relationship is like a short-term marriage, so choose someone you genuinely like and feel compatible with,” we wrote in our book Remodelista, A Manual for the Considered Home. When successful, we might have added, one thing may lead to another. Such was the case for architect Philip Harden, who, after designing two Paris apartments for a couple with two kids, was reenlisted when the family moved on to a house. Located in a historic development in the chic, western Paris suburb of Vaucresson, the early 1900s stucco structure came with an oddball recent side extension—“long, narrow, and lacking communication with the rest of the house,” says Harden. Previously used as a dining room, he transformed this problem area into a tightly orchestrated ensemble—a skinny kitchen plus three dedicated spaces for eating and gathering—that has become among the most lived-in of the family’s new quarters. They may even decide to stay put for a while.

Photography courtesy of Philippe Harden.

Harden labels his projects by letter—this one is House V—and says of his approach: &#8
Above: Harden labels his projects by letter—this one is House V—and says of his approach: “My interventions are in a minimalist spirit while remaining warm through the use of natural materials. My concern is always to adapt the subject to its context and history, and to create the right proportions.”

In this case the extension (scroll down to see the floor plan and a Before shot) was integrated into the flow of the living floor by creating a series of fluid spaces: The long, 215-square-foot kitchen has an eating nook with a yellow banquette at one end and a dining room (open to the living room) at the other, all with new windows. And just outside the glass door shown here is a new terrace with a picnic table. As with all Harden designs, this one is defined by clean geometric shapes, an adept use of positive and negative space, and jolts of rich color.

Custom oak-veneered cabinets have recessed pulls that make the eight-centimeter-thick counter appear to float. It&#8
Above: Custom oak-veneered cabinets have recessed pulls that make the eight-centimeter-thick counter appear to float. It’s hard-wearing Corian, which Harden selected, for “a monolithic look that’s easy to clean.” (See Remodeling 101: Corian Countertops (and the New Corian Look-Alikes).

The windows are Gamme Bois, a wood-framed design by Leul, and have metal Railway knobs from French hardware company Brionne. The matte white ceiling spotlights are Spina Elbow Base GU10 LEDs from TAL.

Tthe breakfast nook has the same custom oak and Corian cabinets as the kitchen, plus a wall cabinet for storing tea, coffee, and cereal. The back window overlooks the garden.
Above: Tthe breakfast nook has the same custom oak and Corian cabinets as the kitchen, plus a wall cabinet for storing tea, coffee, and cereal. The back window overlooks the garden.
The integrated sink—with a Dornbracht faucet—is set at the end of the counter, opposite the fridge and freezer  and next to a steel-framed glass door to the dining room.
Above: The integrated sink—with a Dornbracht faucet—is set at the end of the counter, opposite the fridge and freezer  and next to a steel-framed glass door to the dining room.

The flooring, Harden says, “looks like natural stone but is large ceramic tiles from Lea Ceramiche.”

In the dining room, the windows are matched by a two-doored Gorka Vitrine by AM.PM, &#8
Above: In the dining room, the windows are matched by a two-doored Gorka Vitrine by AM.PM, “a quite economical brand,” says Harden, from online retailer La Redoute (which offers free worldwide shipping on orders over $119). The oak Heldu Chairs and Kuskoa Table are both Jean Louis Iraztzoki designs from French furniture brand Alki. The hanging light is the Chouchin 2  from Ilonna Vautrin’s collection of mix-and-match colored glass pendants by Foscarini of Milan and NYC.
A new wall of steel-framed French doors brightens the space and opens it to the garden. The orange glass light is the Chouchin loading=
Above: A new wall of steel-framed French doors brightens the space and opens it to the garden. The orange glass light is the Chouchin 1.
The steel door frame traces the shape of the eave. Note that the flooring shifts from porcelain tile to wide oak boards with a white oil finish. In the market? See our Guide to The Only 6 Wood Styles You Need to Know.
Above: The steel door frame traces the shape of the eave. Note that the flooring shifts from porcelain tile to wide oak boards with a white oil finish. In the market? See our Guide to The Only 6 Wood Styles You Need to Know.
The &#8
Above: The “outdoor dining room” is furnished with a resin and metal Lester picnic table and benches by AM.PM from La Redoute.
The manicured garden next to the picnic table has an olive tree. The patio extends around to the dining room side of the house. &#8
Above: The manicured garden next to the picnic table has an olive tree. The patio extends around to the dining room side of the house. “It had been a wild garden,” says Harden, who worked with a landscape designer, “but the owners wanted something more slick with a big lawn for their sons to play football.”
The floor plan details the way Harden put the extension to work, while successfully unifying it with the rest of the house.
Above: The floor plan details the way Harden put the extension to work, while successfully unifying it with the rest of the house.

Before

The extension had been a dark, awkwardly shaped dining room with an accent wall in tomato red.
Above: The extension had been a dark, awkwardly shaped dining room with an accent wall in tomato red.

Here are two more of our favorite Philippe Harden projects:

For more kitchen inspiration, browse our Kitchen of the Week archives.

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0