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A Scottish Stone House with a Minimalist Soul (Available for Let)

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A Scottish Stone House with a Minimalist Soul (Available for Let)

March 13, 2019

When the setting is as dramatic as the windswept terrain of the Scottish Highlands, it’s best to leave interiors simple. Which is why, when tasked with saving an abandoned, century-old stone house in the Scottish countryside for conservationist/hotelier group Wildland (the same owners behind Killiehuntly and Glenfeshie Estate), Edinburgh-based architecture firm GRAS (founded by rising star Gunnar Groves-Raines, son of Nicolas Groves-Raines, the architect behind Killiehuntly) left the stone exterior intact but stripped the interiors. Now the rooms are “a series of finely detailed oak boxes” with oversized windows looking to the wilds outside. Kyle House—named for the shallow loch it overlooks—is available for stays, “tailor-made for two persons with extra beds for one to two small children.”

Take a look, then send an email to inquire about availability (there’s no online booking system—”we like to talk with you,” the hoteliers say).

Photography by Martin Kauffman via Kyle House.

The stone house overlooks the Kyle of Tongue loch and is the only inhabited house to have an unobstructed view. It&#8
Above: The stone house overlooks the Kyle of Tongue loch and is the only inhabited house to have an unobstructed view. It’s thought that it was built over a century ago using stone from Dun Mhaigh Broch, a 2,000-year-old structure (the remains of which are still visible on a nearby hilltop), and when the team began work, it was abandoned and leaky. To bring the structure up to date for 2019, the team kept the exterior traditional, fortifying it with stone, slate, and lime.
GRAS kept the interiors limited to &#8
Above: GRAS kept the interiors limited to “a simple material palette of stone, timber, metal, and glass,” with a series of interconnected “oak boxes” fitted inside the existing frame. Here, one of the “boxes” houses the living room.
The living room has a tightly edited color palette as well, with a grey velvet couch and shearling chair.
Above: The living room has a tightly edited color palette as well, with a grey velvet couch and shearling chair.
Inset wooden shelves counterbalance the large window across.
Above: Inset wooden shelves counterbalance the large window across.
The interiors are clad in Danish oak which, here, forms a low window seat for looking out at the moors; firewood, all cut from the grounds, is stacked beneath.
Above: The interiors are clad in Danish oak which, here, forms a low window seat for looking out at the moors; firewood, all cut from the grounds, is stacked beneath.
The concept of &#8
Above: The concept of “oak boxes” is evident down the hallway. The floors throughout are locally quarried black stone, heated from below (see Remodeling 101: 5 Things to Know About Radiant Floor Heating for more on the subject).
The kitchen, with oak counters and barely-visible floor-to-ceiling cabinets.
Above: The kitchen, with oak counters and barely-visible floor-to-ceiling cabinets.
The deep windows create space for a built-in dining bench.
Above: The deep windows create space for a built-in dining bench.
A simply fitted bedroom features a custom bed with dark velvet pillows. Pocket doors can slide across doorways for privacy, or disappear to create a series of interconnected rooms.
Above: A simply fitted bedroom features a custom bed with dark velvet pillows. Pocket doors can slide across doorways for privacy, or disappear to create a series of interconnected rooms.

Above: Details of the moody bedroom.

Down the hall is a generously sized bathroom with a soaking tub and rain shower.
Above: Down the hall is a generously sized bathroom with a soaking tub and rain shower.
Outside, looking out at the Highlands. (Note the inventive fold-out shutters.)
Above: Outside, looking out at the Highlands. (Note the inventive fold-out shutters.)

For more design-worthy places to stay in the wilds of Scotland, see:

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