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Kitchen of the Week: Age-Old Natural Materials in a Modern Addition

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Kitchen of the Week: Age-Old Natural Materials in a Modern Addition

April 7, 2022

At Remodelista, we pride ourselves on sharing not just the pretty images of projects we admire, but also the intel on where to source all the products that go into their designs. That’s our usual M.O. anyway. This time, our only advice for those who want to replicate the look of this handsome London townhouse kitchen is to hire Daniel Sanderson. The British design phenom dreamed up and constructed by hand nearly every little thing in it.

Daniel, a trained architect and masterful woodworker, was brought on to design a rear extension to house the eat-in kitchen. Everything in this space that’s made of wood—countertops, furniture, and architectural details like louvres—is his handiwork, much of it fabricated in his garden workshop. “I’m a product of growing up around tools and watching [my dad] make things,” he told The Modern House, which is where we first stumbled upon this project (the home is currently listed for £1,350,000).

To see the listing, go here. To see more of this incredible kitchen, scroll down.

Photography courtesy of The Modern House.

daniel chose a materials palette of quarry tiles, brick, and wood—all ag 9
Above: Daniel chose a materials palette of quarry tiles, brick, and wood—all age-old building blocks—for the modern extension.
daniel used oak and douglas fir for the joinery and furniture. &#8\2\20;oak 10
Above: Daniel used oak and Douglas fir for the joinery and furniture. “Oak is my favorite material to work with. While it’s quite challenging at times, it has strong structural integrity, finishes beautifully and contrasts to the lighter native Douglas fir.”
the space is light filled thanks to skylights and oversized sliding glass doors 11
Above: The space is light-filled thanks to skylights and oversized sliding glass doors that lead to the patio.
“i always try to be as sustainable as possible—i never throw a pi 12
Above: “I always try to be as sustainable as possible—I never throw a piece of wood away. The end-grain butcher’s block, for instance, is the centerpiece in the kitchen and was made with all the left-over timber that was used for the kitchen cabinets.”
the exposed original sandy brick exterior is now an internal wall in this room. 13
Above: The exposed original sandy brick exterior is now an internal wall in this room.
the view into the interior of the home. 14
Above: The view into the interior of the home.
the quarry tiles extend from the kitchen out to the patio, further blurring the 15
Above: The quarry tiles extend from the kitchen out to the patio, further blurring the line between indoors and out.
gabled louvres reference those on the interior. 16
Above: Gabled louvres reference those on the interior.

For similar kitchens, see:

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