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Trend Alert: 6 Vintage French Shops You Can Browse from Your Laptop

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Trend Alert: 6 Vintage French Shops You Can Browse from Your Laptop

February 13, 2019 February 13, 2019

We’d look for any excuse to book a flight to France, map out a route, and spend a few days scouring flea markets, brocantes, and vides greniers (the French version of a garage sale) for vintage finds. The next best thing? A few small vintage shops, with wares hand-sourced from antiques shops and stalls throughout France, and easily browsable from your couch. Unlike bigger online platforms like eBay and Etsy, these are more curated shops run (and sourced) by individuals and couples, with small selections that frequently sell out (and get replenished). It’s a version of a flea market where the digging has been done for you (no kitschy bric-a-brac included); all your need to do is go online. Here are six shops we like.

1. Nomibis

Based in Reims, France, Nomibis is the project of Fabienne Nominé and her companion Pascal Bisson, who first opened a brick and mortar shop in the city before discovering that they could sell things more efficiently on Instagram. Now, they photograph their found “antiques and eccentricities” in their own house in Reims, then post them on their feed (@nomibis) and on their website. There are no prices listed; reach out to the shopkeepers directly to sort a price. Shown here: a Marble Top Table, styled in their kitchen.
Above: Based in Reims, France, Nomibis is the project of Fabienne Nominé and her companion Pascal Bisson, who first opened a brick and mortar shop in the city before discovering that they could sell things more efficiently on Instagram. Now, they photograph their found “antiques and eccentricities” in their own house in Reims, then post them on their feed (@nomibis) and on their website. There are no prices listed; reach out to the shopkeepers directly to sort a price. Shown here: a Marble Top Table, styled in their kitchen.

Read more about the shop in Nomibis: A Vintage Shop in Reims, France, Shoppable on Instagram.

2. Marston House

French finds in an unlikely spot: a tiny island off the rocky Maine coast. There, Sharon and Paul Mrozinski of Marston House Vinalhaven display wares sourced during their winters in France: &#8
Above: French finds in an unlikely spot: a tiny island off the rocky Maine coast. There, Sharon and Paul Mrozinski of Marston House Vinalhaven display wares sourced during their winters in France: “textiles, silverware, baskets, ephemera, and tons of ironstone,” reports Justine, who traveled to the shop last summer. Can’t go in person? You can find their collections online. Photograph by Justine Hand for Remodelista.

Take a tour of the shop (and the shopkeepers’ apartment, above) in Marston House in Vinalhaven: French Vintage Style in Maine.

3. Les Pénates Reims/Brice Bérard Antiques

Another favorite in Reims: Brice Bérard Antiques and Les Pénates Reims, with mirrors, furniture, and vintage lighting sourced by partners Brice Bérard and designer Annabelle Brun. (&#8
Above: Another favorite in Reims: Brice Bérard Antiques and Les Pénates Reims, with mirrors, furniture, and vintage lighting sourced by partners Brice Bérard and designer Annabelle Brun. (“We buy on a love-at-first-sight basis,” says Brun.) The couple recently combined their talents to remodel a pair of shoppable guest houses, fitted with their antique finds, in the city, which will open this spring. A new website is in the works; until then, the wares are shoppable via the couple’s two Instagram feeds: @briceberardantiques and @les_penates_reims.

For a look inside the guest houses (and Brun and Bérard’s own place), see French Lessons: A Designer and an Antiquary’s Remodeled Guesthouses in Reims (Soon Available to Rent).

4. Elsie Green

We&#8
Above: We’re longtime fans of Elsie Green, the Bay Area-based emporium of French finds, sourced from founder Laurie Furber’s travels through the French countryside. Look for bentwood chairs, stoneware crocks, and rough-hewn cutting boards.

For more on Elsie Green, see French Vintage Style via the Bay Area: Elsie Green in Sebastapol. (And for Laurie’s secrets to scouring flea markets, in Expert Advice: An Insider’s Guide to Sleuthing Antiques and Housewares in Paris.)

5. Super Marché

The cleverly named Super Marché is a collaboration between Elsie Green and design blogger (and longtime Remodelista friend) Victoria Smith of SF Girl by Bay. Shown here: a vintage Formica Coffee Table; shop here for antique furniture and mirrors.
Above: The cleverly named Super Marché is a collaboration between Elsie Green and design blogger (and longtime Remodelista friend) Victoria Smith of SF Girl by Bay. Shown here: a vintage Formica Coffee Table; shop here for antique furniture and mirrors.

6. Madame de la Maison

Madame de la Maison is the one-woman project of Ajiri Aki, who formerly worked in fashion in New York and at the Met’s Costume Institute before studying decorative arts and moving to Paris. Now, she takes day trips to flea markets in the countryside to sleuth the best in classic china, glassware, and more, then offers them for sale (and for rent). Shown here: a vintage Floral Scalloped Haviland Plate, currently available.
Above: Madame de la Maison is the one-woman project of Ajiri Aki, who formerly worked in fashion in New York and at the Met’s Costume Institute before studying decorative arts and moving to Paris. Now, she takes day trips to flea markets in the countryside to sleuth the best in classic china, glassware, and more, then offers them for sale (and for rent). Shown here: a vintage Floral Scalloped Haviland Plate, currently available.

Read more about Aki in Vintage French Style You Can Rent: Madame de la Maison in Paris (and get her entertaining tips in How to Throw a Party the French Way).

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