Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

DIY: A Leather-Detailed Wooden Doorstop

Search

DIY: A Leather-Detailed Wooden Doorstop

November 1, 2017

There’s no need to get fancy when it comes to propping open a door, but a wedge of wood is so much nicer than a mood-killing piece of plastic or rubber. Years ago, my mother returned from a trip to London with a traditional English turned oak doorstop made by David Linley, aka “the royal carpenter.” We have used his handiwork daily ever since, so I was delighted to come across its raffish American-made counterpart: a DIY door wedge created by Anna of Annabode & Co. for Home Made by Carmona. May it open doors for you.

Project and photography courtesy of Home Made by Carmona.

The finished doorstop has a painted tip and an easy-to-grab leather tail.
Above: The finished doorstop has a painted tip and an easy-to-grab leather tail.

Materials

Chances are good you already have what you need to make the door wedge.
Above: Chances are good you already have what you need to make the door wedge.
  • Piece of wood approximately 1.5 inches wide and 6.5 inches long. Use scrap wood or buy a length of wood, such as Home Depot’s Poplar Hobby Board; $5.34 for three feet (enough to make several doorstops).
  • Length of leather, 1/2 inch wide and five inches long. Consider cutting up an old belt.
  • Saw. “Use whatever kind of saw you have on hand,” says Anna.
  • Sandpaper
  • Drill
  • Pencil and ruler
  • High-gloss white paint
  • Minwax Polycrylic, a protective finish.
  • Paintbrushes
  • One No. 6 brass washer. Home Depot sells five-packs of Brass Finishing Washers for $1.18.
  • One No. 6 brass flathead screw. Home Depot sells four-packs of 6 3/4 inch Phillips Flat-Head Wood Screws for $1.18.

Instructions

 Step 1: Mark a diagonal line across the length of your wood, and saw in half. “If you start with a longer piece of wood, it’s easier to mark the six-and-a-half-inch length and saw the diagonal line,” advises Anna.
Step 1: Mark a diagonal line across the length of your wood, and saw in half. “If you start with a longer piece of wood, it’s easier to mark the six-and-a-half-inch length and saw the diagonal line,” advises Anna.
 Step 2: Sand the wood, then mark (and tape off, if you like) the front section and paint white. Treat the rest of the wood with Polycrylic, but not the white tip (because the finish will yellow it).
Step 2: Sand the wood, then mark (and tape off, if you like) the front section and paint white. Treat the rest of the wood with Polycrylic, but not the white tip (because the finish will yellow it).
 Step 3: Drill a small hole through the center of the back end—Anna suggests using the other half of the scrap wood as a base. Use the drill to attach a loop of leather secured with the washer and screw.
Step 3: Drill a small hole through the center of the back end—Anna suggests using the other half of the scrap wood as a base. Use the drill to attach a loop of leather secured with the washer and screw.

The Finished Look

Useful, unobtrusive, and nice-looking. For more details, go to Home Made by Carmona.
Above: Useful, unobtrusive, and nice-looking. For more details, go to Home Made by Carmona.

Keep creating. Here are three more DIY projects perfect for tackling in a weekend:

N.B. This post is an update; the original story ran on May 16, 2017.

Product summary  

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

From our network