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A Trio of Nautical Restaurants from Seattle Chef Renee Erickson

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A Trio of Nautical Restaurants from Seattle Chef Renee Erickson

August 29, 2017

From Seattle chef Renee Erickson (of the sadly departed Boat Street Cafe, my favorite in the city), a trifecta of new restaurants on the hip (and busy) Pike/Pine corridor in the Capitol Hill neighborhood.

Each restaurant has its own storefront, but the three are connected internally throughout 5,700 square feet of space. General Porpoise gets an early start serving filled doughnuts and locally roasted coffee, then hands its kitchen over to nouveau steakhouse Bateau. Connected by a small walkway, Bar Melusine serves Brittany-inspired seafood from a separate kitchen space. The interiors were brought to life by designer Price Erickson and Heliotrope Architects, members of the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory. Let’s take a look.

Photography by Aaron Leitz, courtesy of Heliotrope Architects.

General Porpoise

Doughnut and coffee shop General Porpoise is the early riser of the three, and opens onto the street via an oversize garage door. Erickson was inspired to open General Porpoise after trying a jelly-filled doughnut at St. John in London.
Above: Doughnut and coffee shop General Porpoise is the early riser of the three, and opens onto the street via an oversize garage door. Erickson was inspired to open General Porpoise after trying a jelly-filled doughnut at St. John in London.
The space is a lively pink and white, anchored by a La Marzocco Strada espresso machine, custom powder-coated in pink. Custom brass light fixtures were fabricated by Chris Freed.
Above: The space is a lively pink and white, anchored by a La Marzocco Strada espresso machine, custom powder-coated in pink. Custom brass light fixtures were fabricated by Chris Freed.
On the mezzanine level: additional cafe seating and a communal marble table with pink-painted trestles.
Above: On the mezzanine level: additional cafe seating and a communal marble table with pink-painted trestles.
A porpoise in a captain’s hat extends the nautical theme of the restaurants.
Above: A porpoise in a captain’s hat extends the nautical theme of the restaurants.

Bar Melusine

As at the Walrus & the Carpenter, another Erickson restaurant, the oyster bar is the star of Bar Melusine, which serves Brittany-style raw, smoked, and pickled seafood and shellfish.
Above: As at the Walrus & the Carpenter, another Erickson restaurant, the oyster bar is the star of Bar Melusine, which serves Brittany-style raw, smoked, and pickled seafood and shellfish.
Bar Melusine is named for a water sprite of French and European legend. It seats 50 people, mostly at the bar and in two-person booths.
Above: Bar Melusine is named for a water sprite of French and European legend. It seats 50 people, mostly at the bar and in two-person booths.
The color palette is green and white, with brass and walnut accents. The seafoam green is a nod to the menu’s oceanic origins.
Above: The color palette is green and white, with brass and walnut accents. The seafoam green is a nod to the menu’s oceanic origins.
Melusine’s herringbone floor is made of rough-cut, handmade Moroccan tile.
Above: Melusine’s herringbone floor is made of rough-cut, handmade Moroccan tile.

Bateau

Bateau is Erickson’s take on a steakhouse and a reimagining of Boat Street Cafe. It serves meat that has been raised, butchered, aged, and cooked in-house, between the Bateau kitchen and Erickson’s farm on nearby Whidbey Island.
Above: Bateau is Erickson’s take on a steakhouse and a reimagining of Boat Street Cafe. It serves meat that has been raised, butchered, aged, and cooked in-house, between the Bateau kitchen and Erickson’s farm on nearby Whidbey Island.
Beef hangs from meat hooks in the dry-aging room, and a chalkboard lists the cuts of the day.
Above: Beef hangs from meat hooks in the dry-aging room, and a chalkboard lists the cuts of the day.
Simple pendant cord lights hang in wooden basket shades.
Above: Simple pendant cord lights hang in wooden basket shades.
The neutral-hued restaurant features herringbone wood floors, slate-topped tables, and whitewashed wood siding.
Above: The neutral-hued restaurant features herringbone wood floors, slate-topped tables, and whitewashed wood siding.

For more, see The Whale Wins: A Seattle Restaurant Inspired by the Sea and Westward Ho in Seattle.

N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on August 9, 2016.

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