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Ironman: Artisan-Made Skillets from Upstate New York

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Ironman: Artisan-Made Skillets from Upstate New York

Julie Carlson August 20, 2013

A Remodelista reader clued us in to Borough Furnace, a Syracuse, NY-based blacksmith that makes hand-forged cast iron skillets. Founded in 2011 by cousins John Truex and Jason Connelly, the company began with the backing of 193 Kickstarter investors.

Using their windfall, John and Jason built the custom Skilletron, a barrel-sized metal melting furnace that burns waste vegetable oil at 3000°F to melt scrap iron. “By using old fryer grease to fuel our furnace, we eliminate the massive energy consumption of a typical metal casting operation,” the cousins say. “We only use recycled iron as source material, in keeping with our mission to consume as little as possible.” It doesn’t hurt that the skillets are minor works of art; life-lasting kitchen implements worthy of display. To check availability, go to Borough Furnace.

Above: The Frying Skillet is preseasoned with flaxseed oil; $280.

Above: A detail of the frying skillet. Photo via Serious Eats.

Above: The Braising Skillet is $320. Photo via Serious Eats.

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