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Shou-Sugi-Ban Wood Siding

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Shou-Sugi-Ban Wood Siding

March 7, 2013

The latest trend in wood siding? Burned, charred siding.

Via the blog Pursuing Wabi, one family’s account of building a house in Southern California with Mexico City–born, San Diego–based architect Sebastian Mariscal. “Traditional Japanese homes commonly used shou-sugi-ban as external siding,” the owner writes. “The sugi was burned to resist rot and fire (it’s harder for something already charcoaled to catch fire again). The result is a board that has a dynamic appearance. From different angles it can look black, silver, or dark brown.”

700 shou sugi ban black wood 700 shou sugi ban stand alone shou sugi ban two images 700 shou sugi ban slats 700 shou brooms

Above: The wood boards are burned, brushed, washed, and oiled. For more, see A Teahouse, Charred and Blackened (On Purpose).

N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on July 6, 2009.

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