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Nobis Hotel Copenhagen: 11 Ideas to Steal for a Minimalist-Maximalist Interior

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Nobis Hotel Copenhagen: 11 Ideas to Steal for a Minimalist-Maximalist Interior

October 24, 2017

Recently we’ve been admiring Nobis Hotel Copenhagen, a new hotel in a grand 1903 building that once housed the Royal Danish Conservatory of Music. In renovating it, renowned Swedish architect Gert Wingårdh and his team at Wingårdh Arkitekter maintained the shell (opulent molding, high ceilings, chevron-patterned floors) and added Swedish and Danish furniture, a palette of blues, greens, and grays; marble, and concrete. The result is “a masterclass in marrying old and new,” minimalist fittings in a maximalist interior. Here are ideas to take note of.

1. Embrace a maximalist shell.

The exterior of the 03 landmarked building. ,000-square-foot building,  77 rooms, located between the Tivoli Gardens and the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek museum
Above: The exterior of the 1903 landmarked building. 18,000-square-foot building,  77 rooms, located between the Tivoli Gardens and the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek museum

2. Use unexpected materials.

The concrete reception desk. Wingårdh was inspired by Le Corbusier’s Sainte Marie de La Tourette monastery in Lyon, France; the marble and concrete lobby and reception desk, with low lines and brutalist notes, is reminiscent of the concrete structure.
Above: The concrete reception desk. Wingårdh was inspired by Le Corbusier’s Sainte Marie de La Tourette monastery in Lyon, France; the marble and concrete lobby and reception desk, with low lines and brutalist notes, is reminiscent of the concrete structure.

3. Don’t always add.

For a minimalist-meets-maximalist interior, let ornate details stand on their own. The architects preserved many of the original architectural details, including a wood and marble staircase, and added little in the way of furniture and lighting to give it a grand but stripped-down look.
Above: For a minimalist-meets-maximalist interior, let ornate details stand on their own. The architects preserved many of the original architectural details, including a wood and marble staircase, and added little in the way of furniture and lighting to give it a grand but stripped-down look.

4. Consider color palettes.

Use color to bridge the gap between traditional and contemporary. Wingårdh chose a &#8
Above: Use color to bridge the gap between traditional and contemporary. Wingårdh chose a “subtly elegant color scale that includes beautiful green accents” and shades of blue.
Painted in a palette of blues and greens, the 77 guest rooms feel alternately modern (here) and old-fashioned, like grand ballrooms (above).
Above: Painted in a palette of blues and greens, the 77 guest rooms feel alternately modern (here) and old-fashioned, like grand ballrooms (above).

5. Mix clean-lined furniture with old-world interiors.

In the hotel, the traditional guest rooms provide a backdrop for furniture by Danish company Carl Hansen & Søn; unexpected shapes and wall-mounted boards add an artful, almost sculptural note. (Note the chevron-patterned floors.)
Above: In the hotel, the traditional guest rooms provide a backdrop for furniture by Danish company Carl Hansen & Søn; unexpected shapes and wall-mounted boards add an artful, almost sculptural note. (Note the chevron-patterned floors.)

6. Go maximalist with materials.

 Wingårdh embraced the building&#8
Above: Wingårdh embraced the building’s grand, maximalist spirit in the guest baths, installing floor-to-ceiling Bardiglio Nuvolato marble walls and flooring. Using the same type of marble, and keeping fixtures modern and sparse, keeps the bath from feeling old-fashioned.

7. Make use of height.

Black four-poster beds emphasize the historic building&#8
Above: Black four-poster beds emphasize the historic building’s high ceilings and tall windows without adding visual clutter.

8. Be playful.

Use furniture as an opportunity to be unexpected. Rounded shapes and dynamic built-ins, like this leather-topped desk-and-cabinet hybrid, add a particularly playful feel.
Above: Use furniture as an opportunity to be unexpected. Rounded shapes and dynamic built-ins, like this leather-topped desk-and-cabinet hybrid, add a particularly playful feel.

9. Remove rugs.

The guest rooms are outfitted with small rugs by Swedish brand Kasthall, but otherwise, the wood floors are left bare for a clean, unfussy look.
Above: The guest rooms are outfitted with small rugs by Swedish brand Kasthall, but otherwise, the wood floors are left bare for a clean, unfussy look.

10. Pared-down can feel decadent.

A guest bath feels elegant despite its pared-down elements: a sculptural bath paired with a floor-mounted faucet and simple wooden stool.
Above: A guest bath feels elegant despite its pared-down elements: a sculptural bath paired with a floor-mounted faucet and simple wooden stool.

11. Repeat similar motifs for a different effect.

In one of the hotel&#8
Above: In one of the hotel’s meeting rooms, wide wooden boards—not marble—line the floor and walls for a Scandinavian, rather than glam, effect.

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