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Kitchen of the Week: A Retro Kitchen in London from an Emerging Design Star

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Kitchen of the Week: A Retro Kitchen in London from an Emerging Design Star

April 20, 2017

Designer Jack Hemingway has big shoes to fill. His parents, Wayne and Gerardine Hemingway, are founders of multidisciplinary London design firm Hemingway Design, whose services run the gamut from events and interiors to urban planning, graphics, and fashion (they were behind cult label Red or Dead in the nineties).

But Jack has blazed his own trail, and as a principal designer at the family firm he’s led exhibition design for the Tate, creative direction for UK vintage festivals, and community regeneration projects in Margate, Portsmouth, and Leicester. Luckily, he’s equally talented on more quotidian assignments: Last year Hemingway and his partner, designer Zoe Starreveld, acquired and rehabbed a one-bedroom flat in London’s Kensal Rise. The kitchen was in special need of attention, having suffered a “tatty 1990s refurb job” sporting fake black marble laminate countertops, large-format floor tile, and veneered cabinet doors. They moved several internal walls to link the kitchen to the living room, and to keep costs in check they reused the original cabinet boxes and sourced many items—including flooring, countertops, and range—secondhand.

Now with a six-month-old baby in tow, the duo is looking for a new space, and the flat is currently under offer at The Modern House.

Photography courtesy of The Modern House.

the pair found the vintage parquet flooring from a salvage yard in kent. the bl 9
Above: The pair found the vintage parquet flooring from a salvage yard in Kent. The black range hood is from Ikea.

Hemingway and Starreveld sourced their circa 1950 New World range on eBay. Vintage appliances like this one are priced too high in London, they said, but they found a fair price just two hours outside the city. “The oven was a bargain purchase and is, without doubt, the centerpiece of the kitchen,” Hemingway says.

the vintage green laminate table and yellow stacking chairs are from the nearb 10
Above: The vintage green laminate table and yellow stacking chairs are from the nearby Golborne Road street market. The door at left leads to the rear garden.

The main design goal was, uncommonly, to reduce countertop workspace—in order to make room for a small dining table.

the designers kept only two things from the previous kitchen: a built in stainl 11
Above: The designers kept only two things from the previous kitchen: a built-in stainless steel microwave and the preexisting cabinet boxes; to update the cabinets, they added new white MDF doors. The refrigerator alcove was originally a chimney flue, which the designers removed to make room for the appliance.
 the couple found the apron sink in hemingway&#8\2\17;s parents&#8\2 12
Above: The couple found the apron sink in Hemingway’s parents’ garden, and they designed the faucet themselves.

Starreveld and Hemingway weren’t interested in an off-the-shelf faucet, so they drew plans for a DIY version of copper pipe and hardware-store valves and set their plumber to the task of putting it together. “It was a ‘suck it and see’ kind of situation,” said Hemingway (using a Brit expression meaning to give something a try). “He’d never installed anything like it and didn’t really understand why we wanted to do it.”

the kitchen countertops are iroko—an african hardwood—formerly used as work 13
Above: The kitchen countertops are iroko—an African hardwood—formerly used as worktops in a school science lab and sourced from London architectural salvage Retrouvius.
above, l to r: the kitchen window overlooks a victorian terrace, which is smar 14
Above, L to R: The kitchen window overlooks a Victorian terrace, which is smartly decorated with a Dutch biergarten table and a white brick wall clad in ivy and grapevine. The string shelving was purchased from the Golborne Road flea market, and the vintage ammeter from the clearance sale of a local school.
the mint green clip lamp is from ikea and the ivory espresso machine is kitchen 15
Above: The mint green clip lamp is from Ikea and the ivory espresso machine is KitchenAid.

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