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Head & Haft: A New Old-Style Woodworker in Cornwall

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Head & Haft: A New Old-Style Woodworker in Cornwall

Julie Carlson November 07, 2014

Chris Thorpe of Head & Haft, in Cornwall, England, describes his outfit as “a multidisciplinary product, furniture, home design, and manufacturing business, adhering to the principles of function, beauty, quality, and craft longevity.” His materials include “air-dried, Cornish-cut, seasoned ash, sycamore, beech, and oak, really nicely figured,” as well as wood he finds on his rambles, and local granite, too. 

Above: Milked Side Tables are “inspired by the form and function of old milk stools”; £130 ($205.75).

Above: The Quake Pendant Light is hand-turned and available in walnut, sycamore, and oak; £250 ($395.67).

Above: XL Ash Bowl, £150 ($237.40), is one of many hand-turned bowls by Head & Haft; it’s made from a special slab of ash supplied by a tree surgeon in Cornwall who deemed it “too good to be cut for firewood.”

Above: Chris Thorpe in his studio, near Falmouth.

For US artisan-made furniture, have a look at Sawkille’s Color-Stained Designs and Richard Watson’s Furniture with a Feminine Touch (and a Masculine Name).

This post is an update; the original story ran on July 29, 2014, as part of our Summery Kitchens issue.

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