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Oh, Goodee! Byron and Dexter Peart’s New Essentials for the Home

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Oh, Goodee! Byron and Dexter Peart’s New Essentials for the Home

October 2, 2019

Byron and Dexter Peart—the Canadian twin brothers who founded indie fashion brand WANT Les Essentiels (the label behind that gloriously gender-neutral tote popular among a certain subset of luxury-minded but sensible creatives)—have a new venture up their stylish, minimalist sleeves. Having sold WANT in 2017, they’ve since been training their focus and energy on Goodee, a curated marketplace where, according to its website, “the conscious-minded consumer can find an array of beautiful, essential, and timeless items for the home.”

I recently heard Byron and Dexter speak at Business of Home‘s Future of Home conference and walked away impressed with their vision for ethically made, transparently-sourced goods that also live up to their exacting design standards.

Here, the duo tells us the story behind their new project:

Photography courtesy of Goodee.

Goodee&#8
Above: Goodee’s summer pop-up store in Montreal. “It’s now coming to a close after a very active and exciting four-month run in our hometown,” says Byron. “Next up, we are planning a ‘makers’-focused pop-up shop in New York in time for the holidays.”

Remodelista: How has your experience starting Goodee been different from starting WANT les Essentiels?

Dexter: Our approach to design has very much stayed consistent and grounded in “essentialism.” We are constantly asking ourselves, “What truly needs to exist?” The most profound difference with Goodee’s launch is the timing, as there is no doubt the consumer is far more conscious and increasingly demanding that what they consume is consistent with their values.

Remodelista: Goodee also has its own designs. Tell us about them.

Byron: Yes, we always imagined Goodee creating original product alongside the collections of ethical goods that we curate from makers around the globe. Our first product developments have been conceived and designed in partnership with Ethical Fashion Initiative, an United Nations’ sponsored program, that provides sustainable growth opportunities for artisans in marginalized communities.

Dexter: Our vision is to create products under Goodee brand that are not only timeless design classics but also lead by example in terms of how we source, produce, and share know-how together with the artisans.

Remodelista: Do you have any desire to branch out to designing furniture or other housewares?

Dexter: Absolutely. Stay tuned.

Want to see a sampling of Goodee-approved wares? Here are some of our favorites:

We&#8
Above: We’re admiring these Kapok Mattress Bedrolls by Tensira, from the Republic of Guinea. From the website: “Its hand-spun cotton exterior is complemented by an interior made of 100% kapok, a natural and hypoallergenic fiber that is picked, shelled and filled by hand.” They come in two sizes; $139 and $249.
Dexter has two daughters with his wife, Maria Varvarikos. So, of course, he would have one of these child-sized Charlie Chairs, by Ecobirdy, in his home. They&#8
Above: Dexter has two daughters with his wife, Maria Varvarikos. So, of course, he would have one of these child-sized Charlie Chairs, by Ecobirdy, in his home. They’re made from recycled plastic toys; $199.
Tala&#8
Above: Tala’s Voronoi III Bulb is the largest lightbulb ever made. Each mouth-blown glass bulb measures 7.8 by 15.7 inches; $385 (brass pendant not included). A smaller version sells for $155.
An understated rug with a punk spirit thanks to unconventional tasseling. Nanimarquina&#8
Above: An understated rug with a punk spirit thanks to unconventional tasseling. Nanimarquina’s Tres Rug is made of wool, felt, and cotton; $2,110.
Dexter says of Goodee&#8
Above: Dexter says of Goodee’s Striped Pillows: “The natural cotton fabrics are woven in Burkina Faso, and the pillows are constructed [by a social cooperative] in Kenya.” Each is $159.
Goodee carries quite a few products from Danish brand Skagerak, including their Edge Pots (Byron has them in the home he shares with his husband, Stefan Weisgerber.) They come in various shapes and sizes; from $45 (the smallest vessel pictured here is the Edge Mug for $).
Above: Goodee carries quite a few products from Danish brand Skagerak, including their Edge Pots (Byron has them in the home he shares with his husband, Stefan Weisgerber.) They come in various shapes and sizes; from $45 (the smallest vessel pictured here is the Edge Mug for $25).
The brothers&#8
Above: The brothers’ sensibility can perhaps best be described as sophisticated edginess. This piece, a trio of skateboards featuring Jean Michel Basquiat’s “Trumpet,” by The Skateroom, is displayed in Dexter’s home. The Skateroom makes five versions, each featuring different Basquiat art; $550.

For more on Canadian design, see:

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