Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

A Stone Farmhouse in France Gets an Artful Update from a Paris Firm

Search

A Stone Farmhouse in France Gets an Artful Update from a Paris Firm

August 26, 2019

The challenge: to convert an old farm dwelling in the Loire into a modern, light-filled summer home—with minimal intervention. French firm Septembre Architecture accomplished the brief by executing subtle and discrete interventions: major overhaul not necessary. By matching the delicate color palette found in the original construction materials, the designers masterfully bridge old with new.

Photography by Linus Ricard, courtesy of Septembre Architecture.

After

Septembre Architecture Sereine Kitchen, Photo by Linus Ricard Above: In the kitchen, new materials are introduced through the light wood cabinets, open shelving, and a concrete floor. (See Remodeling 101: Polished Concrete Floors.)
In the living area, by opening up the ceiling to the full height of the house, the architects were able to create a mezzanine level.
Above: In the living area, by opening up the ceiling to the full height of the house, the architects were able to create a mezzanine level.
Vestiges of the original construction can be seen in the wood ceiling lintels.
Above: Vestiges of the original construction can be seen in the wood ceiling lintels.
The original stone fireplace. The white walls in all the rooms form a backdrop to a palette of soft, natural shades.
Above: The original stone fireplace. The white walls in all the rooms form a backdrop to a palette of soft, natural shades.
On the mezzanine, the simple, lightweight detailing of the metal rails contrasts with the heavy wood beams and stone walls of the original house.
Above: On the mezzanine, the simple, lightweight detailing of the metal rails contrasts with the heavy wood beams and stone walls of the original house.
The exposed beams are celebrated in the sparsely decorated bedroom.
Above: The exposed beams are celebrated in the sparsely decorated bedroom.
The existing roofline in an upstairs bedroom is left intact.
Above: The existing roofline in an upstairs bedroom is left intact.
The silhouette of the door follows the roofline.
Above: The silhouette of the door follows the roofline.
In the bathroom, double sinks stand on a welded-steel custom vanity. The Metris Wall-Mounted Faucets are by Hansgrohe; $227.50 from YLiving.
Above: In the bathroom, double sinks stand on a welded-steel custom vanity. The Metris Wall-Mounted Faucets are by Hansgrohe; $227.50 from YLiving.
From the exterior, there is nothing to suggest the modern renovation on the interior.
Above: From the exterior, there is nothing to suggest the modern renovation on the interior.
The farmhouse sits comfortably in the context of its surrounding village.
Above: The farmhouse sits comfortably in the context of its surrounding village.
On one side, a garden.
Above: On one side, a garden.

Before

 The original exposed beams and stone floor.
Above: The original exposed beams and stone floor.
In progress, painterly light included. Above: In progress, painterly light included.

Looking toward the garden.
Above: Looking toward the garden.

For more from Septembre Architecture, see their clever small-space solutions in A Place for Everything in a 900-Square-Foot Loft for Four.

N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on December 9, 2014.

For more French homes, from farmhouses to châteaus, see our posts:

Product summary  

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

From our network