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Architect Visit: Lang Architecture in New York

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Architect Visit: Lang Architecture in New York

Janet Hall November 21, 2010

Drew Lang is the founder of Lang Architecture, a New York-based practice with a satellite office in New Orleans (Lang is a native and is actively involved in several rebuilding projects). “Materials, light, and space define our work,” says Lang, who received his Masters of Architecture from Yale and founded his own practice in 2003. His favorite materials range from rift-cut white oak to oxidized steel to etched glass; below are some examples of how Lang uses these materials in various projects. To see more work, go to Lang Architecture on the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory.

Above: Lang framed a view of a banana tree in a New Orleans residence, bringing a sense of the tropics indoors and balancing the austerity of this modern, marble-clad bathroom.

Above: Lang used rope as an aesthetic element for his design of the Mini Shabu Shabu Restaurant in Queens.

Above: In this New York loft, Lang used rift-cut white oak (rift cut yields a straight grain) for both the flooring and the custom cabinetry; through the opening to the kitchen, the carrara marble backsplash can be glimpsed.

Above: For this elegant Fifth Avenue office entry, Lang created a sense of subtle luxury by combining terrazzo flooring with travertine walls and a blackened steel staircase; the door frames are made of bronze.

Above L: Travertine is a form of limestone with an elegant appearance. Above R: Blackened steel is created through an oxidation process.

Above L: Bronze is a metal alloy created by blending copper and tin; over time, it develops a handsome patina. Above R: Terrazzo is made of marble chips and other fine aggregates; it’s available in a wide range of colors.

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