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On Our Radar: 4 Up-and-Coming Ceramicists to Watch in Maine

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On Our Radar: 4 Up-and-Coming Ceramicists to Watch in Maine

August 23, 2019

We’ve written about ceramics and the talented ceramicists who create them from all corners of the globe—from Portugal to London to North Carolina—so it only made sense to highlight a few from Maine, a place where the artisan spirit is not only alive, but flourishing (in fact, we’re celebrating it all week). On our radar: A new collection from a perennial favorite, a 14th-generation artisan, and more. Here’s a look.

Ariela Kuh

In the coastal community of Lincolnville, Maine, ceramicist Ariela Kuh of ANK Ceramics handcrafts tableware in a charming studio and finishes each piece with glazes mixed in small batches. Shown above is her Black Sand Mug, whose rough texture and purple-black glaze are evocative of its namesake.
Above: In the coastal community of Lincolnville, Maine, ceramicist Ariela Kuh of ANK Ceramics handcrafts tableware in a charming studio and finishes each piece with glazes mixed in small batches. Shown above is her Black Sand Mug, whose rough texture and purple-black glaze are evocative of its namesake.

Hanako Nakazato

Fourteenth-generation ceramicist Hanako Nakazato divides her time between Japan and Maine (see her home in the tiny town of Union here) and brings the sensibilities of both locales to her work. Shown above is a selection of her ridged bowls on display in her own home. Photograph by Erin Little.
Above: Fourteenth-generation ceramicist Hanako Nakazato divides her time between Japan and Maine (see her home in the tiny town of Union here) and brings the sensibilities of both locales to her work. Shown above is a selection of her ridged bowls on display in her own home. Photograph by Erin Little.

Meghan Flynn

Lincolnville, Maine, native Meghan Flynn cites her daily life and the flora and fauna of her coastal home as inspiration for her crafts. The Wood-Fired Teapot shown above is part of a set of 100 pieces she fires in a wood-fired anagama kiln in Swanville, Maine, once a year. The wood-fired kiln, she says, takes four days to load and is stoked round-the-clock for eight days to create a set of one-of-a-kind pieces.
Above: Lincolnville, Maine, native Meghan Flynn cites her daily life and the flora and fauna of her coastal home as inspiration for her crafts. The Wood-Fired Teapot shown above is part of a set of 100 pieces she fires in a wood-fired anagama kiln in Swanville, Maine, once a year. The wood-fired kiln, she says, takes four days to load and is stoked round-the-clock for eight days to create a set of one-of-a-kind pieces.

Michele Michael

Elephant Ceramics‘ Michele Michael was working as a prop stylist when she started making her own ceramics to get the exact shapes and colors she needed for her work. A rural Maine transplant from Brooklyn (check out our tour of her Red Hook apartment here), Michael’s work is inspired by the surrounding nature and incorporates the unique texture of homespun linen. Shown here: Platters from her new collection in shades of indigo. Photograph by Winky Lewis.
Above: Elephant Ceramics‘ Michele Michael was working as a prop stylist when she started making her own ceramics to get the exact shapes and colors she needed for her work. A rural Maine transplant from Brooklyn (check out our tour of her Red Hook apartment here), Michael’s work is inspired by the surrounding nature and incorporates the unique texture of homespun linen. Shown here: Platters from her new collection in shades of indigo. Photograph by Winky Lewis.

More from our design-worthy dive into Maine:

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