Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

Huguet Cement Tile: Handmade on Mallorca Since 1933

Search

Huguet Cement Tile: Handmade on Mallorca Since 1933

January 29, 2018

On Mallorca, an island in Spain’s Balearic chain, the Huguet family has been making encaustic cement tiles using the traditional hydraulic method since 1933. At that time, the colorful tile was at the height of its popularity, and myriad Mallorcan makers supplied tile to architects in Catalonia and Spain. Fast-forward through three generations of family ownership and a vastly different global market for tile, and today, Huguet continues to strictly adhere to age-old production methods while also embarking on creative collaborations with first-rate architects and designers the world over (past collaborators include Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron, English architect David Chipperfield, Mallorcan fashion designer Sybilla Sorondo, and Swiss designer Alfredo Häberli). Let’s take a closer look at Huguet’s standard line and a few collaborations.

Photography courtesy of Huguet.

Even in bright colors, cement tile has a muted, chalky appearance. Here, an entryway composed of black, blue, yellow, and tan tiles from Huguet&#8
Above: Even in bright colors, cement tile has a muted, chalky appearance. Here, an entryway composed of black, blue, yellow, and tan tiles from Huguet’s Plain Tile collection, in a combination created by Slovakian graphic designer Peter Biľak.

Because Huguet tiles are handmade, variations in color, thickness, and size are expected.

The company&#8
Above: The company’s plain tiles come in nearly 40 standard colors, plus fully customizable shades. Here, sample panels show the wide variation to be expected within four individual colors: (clockwise from top left:) white, Llop Gray, Pastor Gray, and black.

In addition to tiles, Huguet makes sinks, showers, stairs, and terrazzo furniture.

A bathroom with blue triangle tiles from the Sybilla collection, a collaboration with fashion designer Sybilla Sorondo.
Above: A bathroom with blue triangle tiles from the Sybilla collection, a collaboration with fashion designer Sybilla Sorondo.
Another bath with Sybilla tiles, this time in pattern 6 Daus in black and white.
Above: Another bath with Sybilla tiles, this time in pattern 6 Daus in black and white.

Herzog & de Meuron used Huguet tiles throughout their Museu Blau in Barcelona, and bespoke terrazzo and cement versions fill Soho House Barcelona.

Sample boards from the Sybilla collection show six tile patterns in red, tan, and black.
Above: Sample boards from the Sybilla collection show six tile patterns in red, tan, and black.
A floor pattern of white triangles with inset black, from a collaboration with Spanish architect Carme Pinós.
Above: A floor pattern of white triangles with inset black, from a collaboration with Spanish architect Carme Pinós.
Graphic tiles in black, tan, and white from the Carme Pinós collection.
Above: Graphic tiles in black, tan, and white from the Carme Pinós collection.

For more Tiles from around the world, see:

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0