Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

Shopper’s Diary: Framed Textiles from St. Frank

Search

Shopper’s Diary: Framed Textiles from St. Frank

September 12, 2018

A framed piece of Senegalese textile art in a Brooklyn house tour captured our attention recently. After discovering its source, St. Frank, we were delighted to find that there’s more where that came from. The San Francisco store, which was named after St. Francis of Assisi (the son of a wealthy textile merchant, who devoted his life to helping the poor), was founded by Christina Bryant in 2012 with two core goals in mind: to economically empower artisans from low- and middle-income countries and to preserve their textile traditions. “I realized that it was difficult to find beautiful pieces for my home that spoke to my values as a global citizen. I wanted my home to tell the story of who I am, and that desire was the foundation for building St. Frank,” she told Forbes. The St. Frank stores (there are outposts in New York City and East Hampton) carry a large selection of handmade wares—table linens, throw pillows, rugs, and more—but it’s their collection of framed textiles, sourced from all over the world, that impressed us most. Here are a few favorites.

Featured photograph by Nicole Franzen, from Rehab Diary: Monochromatic Luxe in Park Slope.

the true indigo piece was made using indigofera tinctoria (or &#8\2\20 17
Above: The True Indigo piece was made using Indigofera Tinctoria (or “true indigo”) grown in Bangladesh. It measures 44.5 by 44.5 inches; $3,750.
the grey otomi features handmade embroidery developed by the otomí pe 18
Above: The Grey Otomi features handmade embroidery developed by the Otomí people of central Mexico. This St. Frank piece symbolizes a ‘tree of life”; $3,350.
the cactus silk xlii piece was created by the berber people of north afric 19
Above: The Cactus Silk XLII piece was created by the Berber people of North Africa. The symbols are inspired by the traditional tattoos on Berber women; $995.
senegalese artist johanna bramble designed the biddew noir piece using a tradit 20
Above: Senegalese artist Johanna Bramble designed the Biddew Noir piece using a traditional technique that is rare today: It requires two weavers to work on the piece simultaneously. The framed art measures 30.5 by 40.5 inches in a white frame; $675. It’s also available in black, maple ($775), and lucite ($1,075).

More textiles love ahead:

(Visited 183 times, 1 visits today)
You need to login or register to view and manage your bookmarks.

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0