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Kitchen of the Week: A Textural Eat-In Cook Space in New England

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Kitchen of the Week: A Textural Eat-In Cook Space in New England

November 10, 2022

The theme of the week on Remodelista? Texture Lessons. So of course we’re returning to Coaster’s Chance: A 1760s Sea Captain’s Cottage in Maine, which, despite its fairly neutral palette, is replete with rich and varied texture: distressed walls, glossy painted floors, rough brick and wood, hardy braided rugs. Just think of it as a texture palette.

Today, we dive deeper into the rustic kitchen.

Photography by Erin McGinn, courtesy of Moore House Design.

coaster’s chance is a \1760s captain’s cottage on the coast of ma 9
Above: Coaster’s Chance is a 1760s captain’s cottage on the coast of Maine, north of Acadia, redone by Moore House Design (it’s been in the family for three decades) and available for rent. Here, a flagstone path leads into the newly rehabbed kitchen.
in the cook space, the moore house team left the original rough hewn supports a 10
Above: In the cook space, the Moore House team left the original rough-hewn supports are in place and added windows for maximum light.
the team also sanded down the original wide plank wood floors and left them bar 11
Above: The team also sanded down the original wide-plank wood floors and left them bare. The kitchen walls are done in plaster.
an antique bakery table makes its home in the center of the space, ideal for co 12
Above: An antique bakery table makes its home in the center of the space, ideal for cooking projects and gathering ’round.
the cabinetry is painted in a pale yellow: sherwin williams’ bosc p 13
Above: The cabinetry is painted in a pale yellow: Sherwin Williams’ Bosc Pear. The countertops are wood.
a smeg fridge is tucked away in a nook. 14
Above: A Smeg fridge is tucked away in a nook.
on the other side of the room is a vintage &#8\2\20;bordeaux color&#8\2 15
Above: On the other side of the room is a vintage “Bordeaux color” wood stove.
the design team asks in their blog post on the kitchen: &#8\2\20;whatȁ 16
Above: The design team asks in their blog post on the kitchen: “What’s the point of a wood stove if there is no spot to curl up by it in?” Thus, there are two Scandi-style shearling chairs alongside.

For more on the project, see Coaster’s Chance: A 1760s Sea Captain’s Cottage in Maine.

And for more ways to incorporate texture in the kitchen, might we suggest:

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