Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.

New Features on Our Memberships and Subscriptions

You are reading

Kitchen of the Week: A Furniture Designer and a Textile Artist Give Their Catskills Kitchen a New Coat of Paint

Search

Kitchen of the Week: A Furniture Designer and a Textile Artist Give Their Catskills Kitchen a New Coat of Paint

May 19, 2022

We’ve long been taken by Catskills-based furniture designer Brian Persico—for his Shaker-esque, impeccably made wood creations, yes, but also for his attention to the most minute details. “I am committed to using only natural materials, and the wood I use is often from less than 20 miles of my home,” Brian writes on his site. “Beyond the wood, metal hardware, and more tangible materials, my finishes and glues are also made with natural ingredients, many of them recreated according to recipes I’ve discovered from times before most of the toxic chemicals available today were available.”

The same is true of the Catskills home Brian and textile artist Hannah Haworth have created together: Like Brian’s furniture, most every bit is sourced locally. (So much so, in fact, that we photographed the house for our forthcoming book, Remodelista: The Low-Impact Home: A Sourcebook for Stylish, Eco-Conscious Livingcoming out from Artisan Books in September.)

Meanwhile, we spotted on Instagram that Brian and Hannah gave the previously neutral kitchen a dark wash of paint in recent weeks. “Here’s the results from painting our kitchen green,” Brian’s Instagram caption read. “This year we learned that with two kids and two big doggos…. a white kitchen is unsustainable.”

Join us for a look—and a report on how the new palette’s holding up.

Photography courtesy of Brian Persico and Hannah Haworth.

all of the cabinetry is brian&#8\2\17;s work, built from trees felled on th 9
Above: All of the cabinetry is Brian’s work, built from trees felled on the couple’s property. “We had painted the kitchen white when we finished building the cabinets, and now after living in it a while we’re starting to go for more color in the kitchen and also in other areas around the house,” Hannah reports. “I like the dark green as it echoes the forest outside. It’s also more forgiving than white as we really cook a lot and love to cook with our kids too, which gets messy pretty quick.”
the only recent change: painting the cabinetry in dark, moody ottosson linseed  10
Above: The only recent change: painting the cabinetry in dark, moody Ottosson linseed oil paint, which creates a color-blocked effect with the existing cobalt Aga stove. “We went with Copenhagen green from Ottosson Paint,” says Hannah. “It’s a color we’ve used on furniture before but not yet on the house.” The step stool is also Brian’s design: It’s the Handmade Painted Maple Step Stool in Marigold.
time worn pots hang above the soapstone farmhouse sink. 11
Above: Time-worn pots hang above the soapstone farmhouse sink.
the counters, too, are soapstone, with a built in drainboard on one side. the d 12
Above: The counters, too, are soapstone, with a built-in drainboard on one side. The dish towel is made from fabric sold by Hannah’s company, Handatextiles.
brian&#8\2\17;s own chairs surround the family&#8\2\17;s table. in the  13
Above: Brian’s own chairs surround the family’s table. In the background, a handmade pine door.
the fridge is fitted with hand carved wooden handles. 14
Above: The fridge is fitted with hand-carved wooden handles.
and the verdict on the newly colorful kitchen? &#8\2\20;it&#8\2\17;s be 15
Above: And the verdict on the newly colorful kitchen? “It’s been less than a month since we applied it—but so far so good,” reports Hannah. “I think we’re gonna keep adding more color.”

For more colorful kitchens:

You need to login or register to view and manage your bookmarks.

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0