Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

Upstairs, Downstairs: A London Home Designed for Two Households

Search

Upstairs, Downstairs: A London Home Designed for Two Households

April 8, 2019

We recently spotted a thoughtfully renovated London townhouse, designed by architect Michela Bertolini, that can accommodate two households. The building spans five levels and has 2,320 square feet of total living space. A central stairwell connects the floors; the upper and lower apartments are open to each other, but each is designed to function separately and privately if desired.

This home, on St. Michael’s Road in London, is currently for sale on The Modern House. Have a look—and tell us what you think.

Photography courtesy of The Modern House.

Lower Apartment

The bottom floor of the lower apartment sits below street level. Just beyond the glazed bifold doors are steps to the back garden.
Above: The bottom floor of the lower apartment sits below street level. Just beyond the glazed bifold doors are steps to the back garden.
White walls and floors keep this basement floor light and bright.
Above: White walls and floors keep this basement floor light and bright.
The view from the dining area to the living room. The palette—white, gray, and black with wood accents—is repeated in every room, on every level of the townhouse.
Above: The view from the dining area to the living room. The palette—white, gray, and black with wood accents—is repeated in every room, on every level of the townhouse.
An office (with a view of the garden) and bedroom are upstairs.
Above: An office (with a view of the garden) and bedroom are upstairs.
These upstairs rooms enjoy wall-to-wall carpeting. The soapstone fireplace is flanked on either side with built-in cabinets.
Above: These upstairs rooms enjoy wall-to-wall carpeting. The soapstone fireplace is flanked on either side with built-in cabinets.
The back garden.
Above: The back garden.

Upper Apartment

Stairs from the lower apartment lead to the upper apartment on the second floor.
Above: Stairs from the lower apartment lead to the upper apartment on the second floor.
The formal living room.
Above: The formal living room.
Original pine flooring was restored where possible and painted black.
Above: Original pine flooring was restored where possible and painted black.
The view from the kitchen into the living room. To the right are the stairs.
Above: The view from the kitchen into the living room. To the right are the stairs.
The original balustrade was painted black and white to reflect the home’s strict color theme.
Above: The original balustrade was painted black and white to reflect the home’s strict color theme.
On the third floor are two bedrooms. An oversized mirror in this one creates the illusion of space.
Above: On the third floor are two bedrooms. An oversized mirror in this one creates the illusion of space.
A narrow bathroom on this floor means no room for a soaking tub. Instead, a limestone shower stall lines one wall.
Above: A narrow bathroom on this floor means no room for a soaking tub. Instead, a limestone shower stall lines one wall.
The second bedroom on the floor. On the fourth floor is a third bedroom.
Above: The second bedroom on the floor. On the fourth floor is a third bedroom.

For more on London living, see:

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

From our network