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Máximo Bistrot in Mexico City

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Máximo Bistrot in Mexico City

May 9, 2024

Máximo Bistrot, located in the heart of the La Roma neighborhood, may not be the newest or flashiest restaurant to debut in Mexico City, but it has become a destination for local luminaries as well as for epicureans traveling to Mexico City. Opened more than a decade ago by chef Eduardo “Lalo” García, with interiors by San Francisco designer Charles de Lisle, the restaurant is still as vibrant as ever. Here’s a look:

Photography via Máximo Bistrot.

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Above: The exterior with hand-wrought lettering.
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Above: De Lisle has a fondness for gingham and modern rusticity.
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Above: Low lighting and flickering candles create an intimate atmosphere.
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Above: De Lisle was inspired in part by the iconic Luis Barragán House in Mexico City in his design for the furniture.”We found a farmer who made all of the chairs and tables from a huge Mesquite tree,” De Lisle tells Huffpo. “He built sturdy, humble pieces in the style of Barragán.” The tree of life bas-relief is illuminated by market candles perched on the branches.
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Above: The napkins and curtains were hand-woven in Oaxaca on small looms.
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Above: The dishes are from a third-generation pottery in Mexico City.
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Above: The English version of the Máximo cookbook is available from Amazon for $90.
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Above: García sources as many native ingredients as possible.

See more Mexico City destinations:

Círculo Mexicano: Soulful Minimalism in Mexico City

Design Travel: 7 Favorite Design Hotels in Mexico

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